Foundation degree (validated by the Royal Agricultural University)

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What does the course cover?

In your first year, you’ll focus on vinegrowing, with modules such as grapevine biology, vineyard establishment and maintenance, and vineyard practical skills. In your second semester, you will enjoy spending a day a week in the vineyard, gaining practical experience in tasks such tractor driving, trellis repairs, and winter pruning. Your first year will also give you the chance to discover the foundations of winemaking, with modules in chemistry, grape processing, and wine analysis.

In your second year, you’ll focus on winemaking, working in the College winery for the harvest. You can look forward to completing a work placement in industry plus a research project, in addition to optional modules in business and wine science. 

The Wine and Spirit Education Trust (WSET) Level 3 Certificate and Diploma are offered as optional additional qualifications.

Entry Requirements:
  • Minimum age: 18
  • GCSE: 5 x GCSE (C/4) including English, Maths and Science
  • UCAS points: 56
  • A-level: CD
  • BTEC: PPM
  • International Baccalaureate: 24
  • IELTS (for students with English as a second language): Level 6.0 overall with Level 5.5 in writing
  • WSET: Level 2 Award in Wines
  • Other: Access to HE Diploma in Science
Duration:

Full-time: 2 years

Part-time: 4 years

UCAS Details:

The UCAS code for this course is P600.

My dream was to become an independent wine-grower in southern France. Plumpton has not only equipped me with the knowledge to do that, it has also given me the conviction and self-belief to make it a reality

Amanda Thompson

Recent FdSc Wine Production graduate

Facilities

You can be assured that in choosing Plumpton, you'll be studying in the heart of the South East of England's dynamic wine production industry and benefiting from our close proximity to the London wine trade. We manage 10 hectares of vineyards here - producing about 40,000 bottles of award-winning still and sparkling wine each year. 

At our Plumpton Wine Centre, you'll discover our outstanding purpose-built facility consisting of a commercial winery, laboratories, research winery plus a wine sensory evaluation room for you to use throughout your studies. 

Library

The library facilities at Plumpton located in the centre of the College campus. There is plenty of space for quiet study and plugs at every desk. The library has extensive computer facilities to support student research and there is also easy access to printers. The library is staffed by the library manager and library assistants.

There are over 10,000 books on land-based subjects, plus a range of magazines and journals, including electronic resources that may be accessed from College or home. The library stocks specialist material that covers a broad range of animal management, conservation and veterinary science subjects to facilitate students in their assignments and research projects. Students also have access to subject-specific e-journals and e-publications.

I.T. Resources

We have a dedicated Higher Education I.T. room here at Plumpton, providing reliable access to a quiet study space and printing facilities.

Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is based on the programme Moodle. It is used daily by both staff and students to ensure that we adhere to the College aim of using modern technology to help support outstanding teaching, learning and assessment at college. Staff are encouraged to empower their students through the use of digital tools both in and outside the classroom. For example, they can provide support before a lesson by uploading lecture slides onto the module page. Digital enhancement can be conducted in a variety of ways during a lesson, such as encouraging student interaction through the use of Virtual Reality. Meanwhile, post-lesson enrichment can come in the form of a lesson-review quiz. Students must also submit assignments online via Turnitin, allowing staff to provide accessible and detailed digital feedback.

HE Study Rooms

HE students have access to their own study rooms that is for the sole use of HE students. The rooms are located in the Research & Development building, and creates a quiet self-study environment for students. Additionally, there is also a dedicated HE common room designed to provide students with a space to relax and engage with other HE students.

Future Opportunities

You will develop valuable vocational skills during this programme. Gaining a good depth of knowledge combined with strong practical vineyard and winery skills, you’ll have lots of opportunities to choose from after graduating. You could become a vineyard manager or winemaker either in the UK or in one of the other wine-producing countries across the globe or establish your own vineyard or winery. Plumpton graduates are now actively involved in the wine industry throughout Europe and in Australasia, South Africa, Canada and the USA.   

*Please note that this programme is subject to validation by the Royal Agricultural University for September 2019 entry.*

Modules

Level 4 Modules

Vineyard Establishment

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCVE4

Module Title

Vineyard Establishment

Module Leader

Chris Foss

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

Module Level

4

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time (hours)


300

 

Contact Hours

 

80

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 65 hours

Practical – 9 hours

Visits – 6 hours

Module Content

This module enables students to investigate the vineyard environment and explore the origins, biology and geography of the grapevine. They will then learn the underlying principles of vineyard establishment, and apply them to a specific commercial scenario.

The module will cover the following:

  • The key aspects of the vineyard environment; weather, climate, soil, and their   interactions with the grapevine.
  • An introduction to the grapevine, encompassing the evolution and classification of the vine, together with a review its structure, function and phenology.
  • World viticulture, wine styles & history.
  • The process of establishing a vineyard for the production of still and sparkling wine, including; site assessment, site preparation and planting, trellis design and materials.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

1.  Explain how the grapevine interacts with its environment.

2.  Identify the structural features of the grapevine, and describe their function.

3.  Apply knowledge and understanding of the grapevine and its environment to make recommendations for successful vineyard establishment.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Vineyard survey (LO1) 

b.  (1800 words)

c.  Vineyard establishment plan (LO3) (2400 words)

30%

 

40%

Examination

d.  Exam on grapevine structure and function (LO2)

(60 minutes)

30%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Vineyard survey (LO1)

(1800 words)

b.  Vineyard establishment plan (LO3) (2400 words)

30%

 

40%

Examination

c.  Exam on grapevine structure and function (LO2) 

(60 minutes)

30%

 

Key learning resources

Creasy, G. L. and Creasy, L. L., 2009. Grapes. Wallingford: CABI Publishing.

Goldammer, T., 2015. Grape grower’s handbook. 2nd ed. Centreville, VA: Apex.

Jackson, R.S., 2014. Wine science: principles and applications. 4th ed. London: Academic Press.

White, R., 2015. Understanding vineyard soils. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Fundamentals of Wine Science

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCFWS4

Module Title

Fundamentals of Wine Science

Module Leader

Tony Milanowski

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture & Oenology (Core)

Module Level

4

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time (Hours)


300

Contact Hours

 

80

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 60 hours

Practical – 20 hours

 

Module Content

This module incorporates the key chemistry concepts that underpin winemaking, as well as laboratory practicals for the chemical analysis of juice and wine. The student will also gain a thorough theoretical knowledge and understanding of grape processing, and undertake a small-scale fermentation in preparation for practical winery work in the following semester.

The module will include the follow:

·  The fundamentals of chemistry to support winemaking, including: atomic structure, chemical bonding, acidity, oxidation and organic chemistry.

·  The chemical analysis of key components in juice and wine, including: sugars, acidity, sulphur dioxide and alcohol.

·  Harvest and grape processing activities for still and sparkling wine.

·  Alcoholic fermentation, and the factors that influence the process.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Explain the underlying chemistry principles that relate to wine production.
  2. Perform key laboratory analyses on juice and wine, and then interpret and communicate the results.
  3. Explain the key decisions concerning grape processing and alcoholic fermentation.
  4. Perform a practical winemaking exercise, then analyse, interpret and communicate the results.

 


First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Laboratory report (LO2) (1500 words)

b.  Winemaking report (LO4) (1500 words)

25%

 

25%

Examination

c.  Chemistry exam (LO1) (1 hour)

d.  Winemaking exam (LO3) (1 hour)

25%

25%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Laboratory report (LO2) (1500 words)

b.  Winemaking report (LO4) (1500 words)

25%

25%

Examination

c.  Chemistry exam (LO1) (1 hour)

d.  Winemaking exam (LO3) (1 hour)

25%

25%

 

Key learning resources

Conoley, C. and Hills, P., 2008. Chemistry. 3rd ed. London: Harper Collins.

Considine, J. A. and Frankish, E., 2014. A complete guide to quality in small-scale wine making. Oxford: Academic Press.

Iland, P., Bruer, N., Edwards, G., Weeks, S. and Wilkes, E., 2013. Chemical analysis of grapes and wine: techniques and concepts. 2nd ed. Campbelltown: Patrick Iland Wine Promotions.

Vineyard Practical Skills

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCVPS4

Module Title

Vineyard Practical Skills

Module Leader

Tom Newham

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time (hours)


150

Contact Hours

 

80

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 8 hours

Practicals – 66 hours

Visits – 6 hours

Module Content

This module will enable students to gain practical skills in key vineyard operations, including the use of tractors and vineyard machinery.

The module will include compulsory health and safety workshops, including; emergency first-aid, manual handling and basic vineyard-work safety. Note, there are no additional costs for students associated with these workshops.

The module will cover the following:

  • Tractor driving, and use of tractor-mounted implements
  • The development of key practical vineyard skills, including; grape harvesting,   trellis erection and repair, bud-rubbing, vineyard floor management and site preparation and planting.
  • The theory and practice of grapevine winter pruning.

Work-based skills will be reinforced through the student maintaining a reflective log to record the development of their vineyard practical skills.

The majority of this module will be delivered on-site in the Plumpton Estate vineyards, where grapes are grown for the production of still and sparkling wines.

Students will also complete the PA1 Principles of Safe Handling and Application of Pesticides course at College, to support the further development of work-based skills. Note, for students who wish to take the assessment for the PA1 award, there is an additional exam fee of c.£90 to pay.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Display the ability to operate a tractor and use vineyard machinery.
  2. Perform key vineyard operations.
  3. Apply the principles of winter pruning.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

a.  Winter pruning (LO3) (25 minutes)

20%

Practical

b.  Continuous assessment, reinforced by reflective record-keeping (LO1 & 2)

80%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

a.  Winter pruning (LO3) (25 minutes)

20%

Practical

b.  Continuous assessment, reinforced by reflective record-keeping (LO1 & 2)

80%

 

Key learning resources

Goldammer, T., 2015. Grape grower’s handbook. 2nd ed. Centreville, VA: Apex.

Kemp, B. and Rice, E., 2012. The winegrowers’ handbook: a practical guide to setting up a vineyard and winery in the UK. London: Posthouse Publishing.

Study and Research Skills

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCSR4

Module Title

Study and Research Skills

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

FdA Wine Business (Core)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time (Hours)


150

Contact Hours

 

45

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

Module Content

This module is designed to support students in the development of the study and research skills they will need to successfully complete their degree. The module covers a number of key study skills including referencing, online search, academic writing, presenting, and essential mathematical operations relevant to the student’s field of study.

The module also equips the student with an understanding of the concept of research, and the reasons for undertaking research relevant to their area of study. The different stages of the research process are explored, and different types of research design are discussed. The module will outline the importance of academic and research integrity, and the consideration that must be given to safety and ethics when conducting research.

Quantitative data analysis and inferential statistics are introduced to support students with the analysis of data collected as part of their degree, as well as with the interpretation of published research. Students will use spreadsheets and statistical software to perform data analysis.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify academic sources to support research and enquiry within their field of study and correctly reference.
  2. Design and document an appropriate method for collecting data to test a hypothesis / answer a research question.
  3. Perform mathematical operations and manipulations that are essential for their field of study.
  4. Analyse data, interpret the results and accurately communicate their findings.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio of exercises, with an average mark of 40% to pass (LO1-4)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio of exercises, with an average mark of 40% to pass (LO1-4)

100%

 

Key learning resources

Anglia Ruskin University, 2017. Guide to the Harvard system of referencing. [online]. Available at:<https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm.> [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Braun, V. and Clarke, V., 2013. Successful qualitative research: a practical guide for beginners. London: Sage.

CETL-AURS, 2012. Engage in research. [online] Available at:< http://www.engageinresearch.ac.uk/>. [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Science.

Gustavii, B., 2017. How to write and illustrate a scientific paper. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rowntree, D., 2000. Statistics without tears: an introduction for non-mathematicians. London: Penguin Books.

Understanding Wine Styles

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCUWS4

Module Title

Understanding Wine Styles

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

FdSc Wine Production (Core) 

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core) 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time


150 hours

Contact Hours

 

40 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

1

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

 

Module Content

This module will introduce students to the key wine producing regions of the world, to their individual characteristics and to their differences. By the end of the module students will be able to recall and identify the practices influencing the principal wines of the world.

·  The key wine producing regions of the world.

·  The effect of key factors influencing the style, quality and price of the wines produced, including location, soil, climate and viticultural and vinification practice.

·  The legal requirements for the labelling of still, sparkling and fortified wines for sale within the European Union.

·  The use of the WSET Level 3 systematic approach to tasting to produce tasting notes and assess the quality of wines.

The content of this module will cover the syllabus for the Wine and Spirits Education Trust (WSET) Level 3 Award in Wine, and students will be invited to take the WSET Level 3 exam as an optional additional qualification.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Display a knowledge and understanding of the principal wines of the world.
  2. Identify the key factors influencing the production of the principal wines of the world and explain how these factors influence their style, quality and price.
  3. Describe accurately the organoleptic characteristics of the principal wines of the world.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

Tasting/theory exam (LO1-3) (2 hours)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written report (LO1-3) (3000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Johnson, H. and Robinson, J., 2013. The world atlas of wine. 7th ed. London: Mitchell Beazley.

Stevenson, T., 2011. The Sotheby’s wine encyclopaedia. 5th ed. London: Dorling Kindersley.

WSET, 2016. Understanding wines: explaining style and quality. London: WSET.

Wine Sensory Evaluation

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWSE4

Module Title

Wine Sensory Evaluation

Module Leader

Greg Dunn

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

FdSc Wine Production (Core) 

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core) 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours


40 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

2

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

 

Module Content

Wine Sensory Evaluation will see students exploring and assessing the major components found in commercial wines, whilst also being introduced to basic sensory science theory. In addition, this module will introduce the subject of wine faults, wine describing and wine scoring. By the end of the module students will be comfortable recognising common wine aromas and key wine components through tasting.

·  The basic anatomy and physiology of the sense organs in humans relevant to wine evaluation.

·  Basic sensory science theory, including sample preparation, measurement, analysis and interpretation of characteristics in wine.

·  Training exercises to teach the recognition and evaluation of the intensity of key wine components, such as paired comparison, duo-trio.

·  Sensory evaluation exercises in wine description, wine profiling and wine scoring.

·  Wine aroma profiling.

·  Wine faults, including oxidation, taints and instabilities.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Describe the principal mechanisms of sensory perception.
  2. Apply the underlying principles of wine sensory evaluation.
  3. Recognise and quantify key wine components through tasting.
  4. Recognise common wine aromas and basic wine faults.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Poster and peer presentation (LO1-2)

40%

Practical

b.  Series of practical tests (LO3-4) (75 minutes)

60%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report on sensory mechanisms (LO1-2) (1200 words)

b.  Written report on major components in wine (LO3-4) (1800 words)

100%

 

Key learning resources

Iland, P., Bruer, N., Ewart, A., Markides, A. and Sitters, J., 2012. Monitoring the winemaking process from grapes to wine: techniques and concepts. 2nd ed. Campbelltown: Patrick Iland Wine Promotions.

Kemp, S., Hollowood, T. and Hort, J. 2009. Sensory evaluation: a practical handbook. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Peynaud, E., 1987. The taste of wine. London: MacDonald & Co.

Rankine, B., 1990. Tasting and enjoying wine: a guide to wine evaluation for Australia and New Zealand. Adelaide: Winetitles.

 

Level 5 Modules

Vineyard Management

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCVM5

Module Title

Vineyard Management

Module Leader

Chris Foss

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

Vineyard Establishment

Minimum Study Time (hours)

300

Contact Hours

80

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 71 hours

Practical – 9 hours

 

Module Content

This modules provides students with a thorough knowledge and understanding of grapevine physiology, then enables them to apply this to develop strategies for managing vineyards, including the management of grapevine pests and diseases.

The module will cover the following:

  • The biological mechanisms and processes relating to the growth and the development of the grapevine.
  • The processes and interventions related to the successful management of vineyards, including; nutrition, vineyard floor management, canopy management.
  • The identification and management of grapevine pests, diseases and abiotic hazards.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Describe the biological mechanisms that govern grapevine growth and development.
  2. Recommend successful strategies for the management of vineyards.
  3. Identify the symptoms of major biotic and abiotic stresses in grapevines, and evaluate the effectiveness of different grapevine protection strategies.

 


First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Vineyard management report (LO2) (1800 words)

b.  Grapevine protection information resource (LO3) (2400 words)

30%

 

40%

Examination

c.  Exam on grapevine physiology (LO1) (1 hour)

30%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Vineyard management report (LO2) (1800 words)

b.  Grapevine protection information resource (LO3) (2400 words)

30%

40%

Examination

c.  Exam on grapevine physiology (LO1) (1 hour)

30%

 

Key learning resources

Creasy G. L. and Creasy. L. L., 2009. Grapes. Wallingford: CABI Publishing.

Jackson, R. S., 2014. Wine science: principles and applications. 4th ed. London: Academic Press.

Iland P., Dry, P. Proffitt, T. Tyerman , S., 2011. The grapevine: from the science to the practice of growing vines for wine. Campbelltown: Patrick Iland Wine Promotions.

Sadava D.E., Hillis D.M., Heller H. C. and Hacker I., 2016. Life: the science of biology. 11th ed. Sunderland, MA: WH Freeman.

Wilcox, W.F., Gubler, W.D., Uyemoto, J.K, 2015, Compendium of grape diseases, disorders and pests. 2nd ed. St Paul, MN. American Psychopathological Society.

Wine Production and Analysis

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWPA5

Module Title

Wine Production and Analysis

Module Leader

Tony Milanowski

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture & Oenology (Core)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

Fundamentals of Wine Science

Minimum Study Time (Hours)


300

Contact Hours

 

80

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 60 hours

Practical – 20 hours

Module Content

This module explores alcoholic fermentation, and subsequent winery operations, in considerable depth, enabling students to take key decisions in a commercial winemaking environment. Students will also be introduced to sensory and laboratory techniques for analysing and evaluating still and sparkling wine.

The module will cover the following:

·  The microbiological processes of alcoholic and malolactic fermentations, including an introduction to yeast & bacteria metabolism.

·  Pomace wine vinifications processes

·  Post-alcoholic fermentation processing, including; oak maturation, clarification and stabilisation.

·  Wine packaging considerations and operations.

·  Prevention and treatment of the major problems in wine, including instabilities and microbial spoilage.

·  Methods for the laboratory analysis of wine, including; chromatography, distillation, spectrophotometry.

·  Application of sensory evaluation to wine production.

 


Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Perform a practical winemaking investigation, and then analyse, evaluate and communicate the results.
  2. Evaluate key decisions related to winemaking, from alcoholic fermentation to packaging.
  3. Research common winemaking problems and make appropriate recommendations.
  4. Investigate key wine quality factors via chemical and sensory analysis.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Winemaking trial report (LO1) (1500 words)

b.  Poster (LO3)

c.  Portfolio of analysis (LO4) (1500 words)

25%

 

25%

25%

Examination

d.  Winemaking exam (LO2) (1 hour)

25%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Winemaking trial report (LO1) (1500 words)

b.  Poster (LO3)

c.  Portfolio of analysis (LO4) (1500 words)

25%

 

25%

25%

Examination

d.  Winemaking exam (LO2) (1 hour)

25%

 

Key learning resources

Considine, J. A. and Frankish, E., 2014. A complete guide to quality in small-scale wine making. Oxford: Academic Press.

Heymann, H. and Ebeler, S.E., 2017. Sensory and instrumental evaluation of alcoholic beverages. London: Academic Press.

Iland, P., Bruer, N., Edwards, G., Weeks, S. and Wilkes, E., 2013. Chemical analysis of grapes and wine: techniques and concepts. 2nd ed. Campbelltown: Patrick Iland Wine Promotions.

Jackson R. S., 2014. Wine science: principles and applications. 4th ed. London: Academic Press.

Kemp, S.E., Hollowood, T. and Hort, J., 2009. Sensory evaluation: a practical handbook. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

 

Winery Practical Skills

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWPS5

Module Title

Winery Practical Skills

 

Module Leader

Sarah Midgley

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Fundamentals of Wine Science

Minimum Study Time (Hours)

150

Contact Hours

80

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Practical – 80 hours

Module Content

This practical module enables students to learn key winery skills, from grape processing to bottling. Practical skills will be assessed throughout the module, and students will be required to keep a reflective log of their progress.

The module will start with a compulsory two-day winery health and safety workshop, delivered before commencing the main activities of this module.

This module will cover the following winery interventions:

·  Grape processing: de-stemming/crushing, pressing

·  Use of sulphur dioxide and other must treatments

·  Must adjustment, including; chaptalisation, de-acidification, clarification

·  Yeast and bacterial inoculation

·  Fermentation monitoring and control

·  Wine stabilisation, use of fining agents

·  Use of barrels and other oak products

·  Wine clarification and filtration

·  Sanitation, sterilising and bottling

·  Bottling, riddling and disgorging sparkling wine

Work-based skills will be reinforced through the student maintaining a reflective log to record the development of their winery practical skills.

Students will also develop knowledge and understanding of legislation relating to; EU and UK wine production, trading standards, food safety, and relevant occupational health and safety.

This module is delivered on-site in the Plumpton Estate commercial winery, which produces award winning still and sparkling wines.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Perform essential practical winery interventions.
  2. Apply underlying oenology concepts and principles in a commercial winery environment.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of winemaking legislation.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

a.  Exam (LO3) (25 minutes)

20%

Practical

b.  Continual assessment, reinforced by reflective record keeping (LO1-2)

80%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

a.  Exam (LO3) (25 minutes)

20%

Practical

b.  Continual assessment, reinforced by reflective record keeping (LO1-2)

80%

 

Key learning resources

Considine, J. A. and Frankish, E., 2014. A complete guide to quality in small-scale wine making. London: Academic Press.

Iland, P., Bruer, N., Edwards, G., Weeks, S. and Wilkes, E., 2013. Chemical analysis of grapes and wine: techniques and concepts. 2nd ed. Campbelltown: Patrick Iland Wine Promotions.

Jackson, R. S., 2014. Wine science: principles and application. 4th ed. London: Academic Press.

Work Placement

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWP5

Module Title

Work Placement

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

10

Work based learning

150 hours

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 10 hours, consisting:

-  Launch lectures

-  Group and individual support tutorials

 

Module Content

Students will take part in a work placement relevant to their field of study, comprising 150 hours of work-based learning. This will be an invaluable opportunity to learn more about their area of interest, whilst establishing industry contacts in a professional environment. Upon completion of the placement students will be required to compile a report, evaluating the knowledge and skills developed therein.

·  Selection and organisation of work placement or employer-led project, including meeting health and safety requirements, in a relevant sector.

·  Completion of work placement or employer-led project.

·  Development of both subject-specific skills and work-related skills such as numeracy, communication, interpersonal/teamwork, self-management and skills necessary for self-managed and lifelong learning.

·  Identify incidences that occurred during the work placement that were significant relevant to the subject area and evaluate their importance.

·  Submit a report that evidences the learning outcomes.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Appraise, and justify the selection of, their workplace provider.
  2. Analyse how the knowledge and skills gained in their studies have impacted upon their work placement.
  3. Evaluate the knowledge and skills developed whilst on work placement.
  4. Identify and evaluate a critical incident relevant to the area of study that occurred during the work placement.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Placement report (LO1-LO3) (4200 words)

Presentation (LO4)

70%

 

30%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Placement report (LO1-LO4)

100%

 

Key learning resources

Fanthome, C., 2004. Work placements: a survival guide for students. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

McCabe, M., 2014. How to get an internship or work placement. North Charleston: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Herbert, I. and Rothwell, A., 2004. Managing your placement: a skills-based approach. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

 

Independent Enquiry

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCIE5

Module Title

Independent Enquiry

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (core)

FdSc Wine Production (elective)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour & Conservation (core)

 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Study and Research Skills (L4) or equivalent

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

2 hours group tutorial

1 hour supervision

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

 

Contact hours = 3 x 20 minute project supervision tutorials.

Module Content

The Independent Enquiry module enables students to explore and research a topic of interest, relevant to their field of study. The enquiry will require the demonstration of skills acquired throughout the students’ studies, such as data collection, critical analysis and communication skills.

With the support of a supervisor, the student must agree an appropriate project title that will allow for an in-depth investigation relevant to their field of study, carry out a literature review of the subject area chosen, plan and perform an investigation, deliver a work-in-progress presentation (formative), and finally present the results in a report form (summative).

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Present their work in progress findings, demonstrating an ability to plan their time effectively.
  2. Evaluate appropriate research and literature relating to their research aims.
  3. Use a range of established techniques to initiate and undertake critical analysis of information.
  4. Effectively communicate the findings of their independent enquiry.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Final project (3,000 words)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Final project (3,000 words)

100%

 

Key learning resources

Leedy, P.D. and Ormond, J. E., 2015. Practical research: planning and Design. 11th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Ridley, D., 2012. The literature review: a step-by-step guide for students. 2nd ed. London: Sage.

Walliman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Wisker, G., 2009. The undergraduate research handbook. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 

Research Methods and Statistics

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCRMS5

Module Title

Research Methods and Statistics

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Elective)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

FdA Wine Business (Elective)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Elective)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Study and Research Skills

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

60

Work based learning


None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 60 hours:

·  Teaching to run through to Easter in Semester 2.

·  Input around research proposal elements (e.g. identifying a topic and experimental design) supported by sessions run within individual programmes.

Module Content

The Research Methods and Statistics module builds upon content covered in the Level 4 Study and Research Skills module.  This Level 5 module provides the student with the skills required to critically evaluate research, to statistically analyse and interpret quantitative data/analyse and interpret qualitative data.

The module has a strong applied and practical focus; the statistical methods are introduced through hands-on sessions using a statistical software package, and one of the assessments leads to the design of a Level 6 research project proposal.

The module will cover the following aspects:

·  The identification of appropriate sources of information to support research, including the critical evaluation of published work.

·  Communication of research to a variety of audiences and in different formats.

·  The identification of viable research problems and the selection of appropriate research strategies, taking into consideration the safety and ethical aspects of research.

·  The collection and analysis of data using a range of statistical methods, including parametric and non-parametric methods, and multivariate techniques.

 

Learning Outcomes 

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify a topic of investigation within your field of study and conduct a systematic literature review.
  2. Generate a written proposal for an independent investigation, incorporating an appropriate and robust research design.
  3. Select, justify and apply appropriate statistical techniques to support quantitative research or appropriate qualitative data analysis.
  4. Interpret the results of statistical analysis or qualitative data analysis, draw appropriate conclusions, and communicate the results effectively and accurately.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a. Research proposal (LO1-2) (1500 words)

b. Portfolio of statistical analysis, (LO3-4)

50%

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a. Research proposal (LO1-2) (1500 words)

b. Portfolio of statistical analysis (LO3-4)

50%

50%

 

Key learning resources

Bryman, A. and Bell, E. 2015. Business Research Methods.

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Fowler, J., Cohen, L. and Jarvis, P., 1998. Practical statistics for field biology. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Markman, R., Markman, P. T. and Waddell, M. L., 2001. 10 steps in writing the research paper. Hauppauge: New York.

McDonald, J. H., 2014. Handbook of biological statistics. [on-line] Available at: <http://www.biostathandbook.com> [Accessed 16th September 2016].

Petrie, A. and Watson, P., 2013. Statistics for veterinary and animal science. 3rd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Ridley, D., 2012. The literature review: a step-by-step guide for students. 2nd ed. London: Sage.

Ruxton, G. F. and Colegrove, N., 2016. Experiment design for the life sciences. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Silverman, D. 2010. Qualitative Research. London : Sage.

Walliman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Welham, S.J., Gezan, S.A., Clark, S.J. and Mead, A., 2014. Statistical methods in biology: Design and analysis of experiments and regression. Boca Raton: CRC Press.

Plus GenStat Teaching & Learning on-line help and guides, accessible from within the software and online.


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