Foundation Degree (validated by the Royal Agricultural University)

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What does the course cover?

This course offers the ideal combination in equine science and practical skill development. Modules are particularly tailored for a career in coaching but are equally applicable across a range of professions within the equine industry.

With some of the highest qualified BHS instructors in its team Plumpton College can offer a standard of coaching not available elsewhere in the South East. After a generic first year covering topics such as Equine Anatomy, Nutrition and Behaviour, specialist subjects in the second year include Coaching for Competition and Applied Performance Training where students will be able to develop their skills through a series of real case studies. Some practical experience and knowledge of horses is essential prior to joining the programme.

Our large equine unit has a well-equipped yard for up to 40 horses, two indoor schools, an outdoor school, a horse walker, and a cross-country course. Students will be able to make full use of the facilities throughout their studies. Plumpton College Equine department has also recently renewed its BHS Examination Centre so will be encouraging and training students to complete their BHS qualifications.

Personal Accreditation

Whilst studying for the degree you can choose to train for the British Horse Society (BHS) examinations. This is optional and not included in course fees. Students are expected to register independently with the BHS.

Course Structure

Modules are delivered in a variety of ways including lectures, practical sessions on the College yard, equitation sessions and field trips. Opportunities are also available for you to undertake work experience abroad.

A programme specification can be requested for more detailed course information.

Entry Requirements:
  • Minimum age: 18
  • GCSE: 5 x GCSE (C/4) including English, Maths and Science
  • UCAS points: 56
  • A-level: CD
  • BTEC: PPM
  • International Baccalaureate: 24
  • IELTS (for students with English as a second language): Level 6.5 overall with Level 6.0 in writing
  • Other: Access to HE Diploma in Science
Duration:

Full-time: 2 years 

Part-time: 4 years

UCAS Details:

The UCAS Code for this course is P400.

The best thing about the equine degree course at Plumpton is the wide range of subjects offered and the mix between practical and academic. As a mature student embarking on a second career it has given me a taster of every aspect of the equestrian industry and opened my eyes to the breadth of career opportunities available. The practical training received is brilliant preparation for anyone thinking about doing the BHS pathways and within the first year I went from having very little practical skills to being BHS Stage 2 level.

Susan Mooney

Current 2nd year

Facilities

We’re very proud of our excellent equine facilities here at Plumpton. Lots of space and excellent facilities, you’ll get to enjoy lots of hands-on time with our horses as well as building your knowledge of this fascinating industry.

  • Come and visit our two large schools here at Plumpton

We’ve got two large indoor schools on-site, complete with galleries, for you to enjoy during your course.

  • Lots of space for you to enjoy outdoors at our extensive estate

You’ll be able to use our 30m x 60m outdoor menege during your course in addition to stabling for 50 horses.

  • A variety of horses for you to experience and enjoy

We make sure that you get to work with and ride a variety of different horses throughout your time at Plumpton including Shire horses.

  • The latest equine facilities are available on-site

Keep up with the latest technologies introduced in the industry. You’ll get to experience equipment such as a cross-country course, treadmill and weigh bridge.

Library

The library facilities at Plumpton located in the centre of the College campus. There is plenty of space for quiet study and plugs at every desk. The library has extensive computer facilities to support student research and there is also easy access to printers. The library is staffed by the library manager and library assistants.

There are over 10,000 books on land-based subjects, plus a range of magazines and journals, including electronic resources that may be accessed from College or home. The library stocks specialist material that covers a broad range of animal management, conservation and veterinary science subjects to facilitate students in their assignments and research projects. Students also have access to subject-specific e-journals and e-publications.

I.T. Resources

We have a dedicated Higher Education I.T. room here at Plumpton, providing reliable access to a quiet study space and printing facilities.

Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is based on the programme Moodle. It is used daily by both staff and students to ensure that we adhere to the College aim of using modern technology to help support outstanding teaching, learning and assessment at college. Staff are encouraged to empower their students through the use of digital tools both in and outside the classroom. For example, they can provide support before a lesson by uploading lecture slides onto the module page. Digital enhancement can be conducted in a variety of ways during a lesson, such as encouraging student interaction through the use of Virtual Reality. Meanwhile, post-lesson enrichment can come in the form of a lesson-review quiz. Students must also submit assignments online via Turnitin, allowing staff to provide accessible and detailed digital feedback.

HE Study Rooms

HE students have access to their own study rooms that is for the sole use of HE students. The rooms are located in the Research & Development building, and creates a quiet self-study environment for students. Additionally, there is also a dedicated HE common room designed to provide students with a space to relax and engage with other HE students.

Future Opportunities

The course will prepare you for careers including yard management, breeding and stud farm management, competition grooming, riding instruction, equine sports coaching, equine rehabilitation and therapy and management.

Foundation degree holders can continue their studies for a further one or two years, depending on grades achieved, on the Equine Science and Coaching Honours Degree at Plumpton College.

Modules

Equine Functional Anatomy

   

Module Code

 PCCAB6

Module Title

Equine Functional Anatomy

Module Leader

Hannah Davis

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

 

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time


300 hours

Contact Hours

 

70 hours

 

Work based learning

 
None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 2.5 hours per week

 

Module Content

Students studying this module will develop an in-depth knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the equine, including but not limited to the respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, nervous, excretory and digestive systems of the horse. 

Students will develop knowledge of the biomechanics of the equine athlete and be able to explain how the systems of the body interrelate to allow the horse to carry out maintenance functions and exercise.

Practical sessions will involve dissections in order to develop the student’s understanding of equine anatomy.

 

Learning Outcomes 

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, reproductive, nervous, excretory and digestive systems of the horse.
  2. Examine the role of the musculoskeletal system in producing locomotion.
  3. Explain how the systems of the body interrelate to allow the horse to carry out maintenance functions and exercise.

 

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

 

 

Examination

Written (2 hours)

 

100%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

Written (2 hours)

 

100%

Key learning resources

Davies, Z., 2018. Equine science. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Denoix, J., 2000. The equine distal limb, an atlas of clinical anatomy and comparative imaging. London: Manson.

Clayton, H., Flood, P. F. and Rosenstein, D. S., 2005. Clinical anatomy of the horse. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Hodgson, D., McGowan, C. M. and McKeever, K., 2013. The athletic horse: principles and practice of equine sports medicine. 2nd ed. St. Louis, MO: Saunders.

Marlin, D., and Nankervis, K., 2002. Equine exercise physiology. Oxford: Blackwell.

Tortora, G. J. and Derrickson, B., 2017. Principles of anatomy and physiology. 15th ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

 

Equine Nutrition

   

Module Code

 PCEN4

Module Title

Equine Nutrition

Module Leader

Kay Adams

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

 

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150

Contact Hours

 
35

Work based learning

None

Semester

1

Scheduled teaching – 2 hours per week

Visits – 7 hours

Module Content

This module will give the student a thorough grounding in the anatomy and physiology of each organ of the digestive system, action of digestive secretions and processes on dietary constituents. This will be delivered using a combination of lecture-based theory sessions, practical sessions and dissections.

Students will also be expected to create a ration formulation and thus demonstrate a knowledge of the properties and functions of macronutrients, micronutrients, and dietary sources for a range of discipline specific needs.

Students will have the opportunity to develop industry links through a visit to a feed mill and equine nutritionist guest lectures.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Explain the structure, role and site of digestion of different nutrient groups.
  2. Calculate and justify a detailed feed ration.
  3. Evaluate differences in nutrient requirements of equines according to need.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written (Ration Formulation) (2,000 words)

50%

Examination

Written (1 hour)

50%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written (Ration Formulation) (2,000 words)

50%

Examination

Written (1 hour)

50%

 

Key learning resources

Cuddeford, D., 1996. Equine nutrition. Marlborough: The Crowood Press.

Finch, H., Samuel, A. and Lane, G. P., 2014. Lockhart and Wiseman’s crop husbandry including grassland. 9th ed. Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing.

Frape, D., 2010. Equine nutrition and feeding. 4th ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Kreling, K., 2005. Horse’s teeth and their problems: prevention, recognition, treatment. Illustrated ed. Richmond: Cadmos Equestrian

Pilliner, S., 1999. Horse nutrition and feeding. 2nd ed. Oxford: Blackwell.

Websites:

https://ker.com/published/

 

Equitation

     

Module Code

 PCEQ4

Module Title

Equitation

Module Leader

Debbie Melville

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Elective)

 

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Level 3

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

70 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 2.5 hours per week (1 x flat lesson, 1 x jump)

 

Module Content

This module will give students a basic understanding of equitation theory in order to demonstrate correct riding positions for working horses both on the flat and over jumps. Students will learn to assess and evaluate their own performance and that of a range of horses through the application of classical training principles, from which a plan for improvement can be developed. The module will be aligned with the performance criteria for the British Horse Society Stages 1-4.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an established, balanced riding position for riding on the flat and over jumps.
  2. Analyse their own performance and that of a range of horses within a session according to classical training principles.
  3. Develop strategies for short and long term improvement of personal and horse performance.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Equitation Portfolio

50%

Practical

Ridden Sessions 

50%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Equitation Portfolio

50%

Practical

Ridden Sessions

50%

Key learning resources

Anglia Ruskin University, 2017. Guide to the Harvard system of referencing. [online]. Available at:<https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm.> [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Bell, J. and Day, A., 2008. 101 Schooling exercises: for horse and rider. Newton Abbott: David & Charles.

British Dressage, 2018. British Dressage rules for 2018.  Kenilworth: British Dressage. 

British Eventing, 2018. British Eventing rules for 2018. Kenilworth: British Eventing.

British Show Jumping, 2018. British show jumping, rules and competitions for 2018 Kenilworth: British Show Jumping.

The British Horse Society, 2017. Ride safe: a modern approach to riding safely in all environments. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

British Horse Society, 2017. BHS complete horsemanship volumes 1-3. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

German National Equestrian Federation, 2017.The principles of riding: basic training for horse and rider. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press

Jago, W., 2006. Score more for your dressage. London: J.A. Allen.

Karl, P., 2010. The art of riding: classic dressage to high school. 2nd ed. Richmond: Cadmos.

Kottas-Heldenberg, A. and Rowbotham, J., 2010. Kottas on Dressage. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Lilley, C., 2010. The Scales of training workbook: for dressage and jumping. London: J. A. Allen.

Lush, D., 2008. Building blocks of training. London: J. A. Allen.

Moffett, H., 2011. Enlightened equitation: riding in true harmony with your horse. Revised ed. Paignton: Enlightened Equitation. 

The Pony Club, 2012. Manual of horsemanship. 14th ed. Kenilworth: The Pony Club.

Smiley, E., 2009. Look ….no hands! Kenilworth: The Pony Club.

Stockdale, T., 2004. A young person’s guide to show jumping. Kenilworth: The Pony Club.

Papers:

McGreevy, P.D. 2007. The advent of equitation science. The Veterinary Journal 174 pps 492-500

McLean, A. 2010. A fresh look at the Training Scale with Andrew McLean http://www.horsemagazine.com/thm/2014/12/a-fresh-look-at-the-training-scale-with-andrew-mclean/

Websites:

The British Horse Society Excellence Pathway and Resource Hub (www.bhs.org.uk).

Equitation Science. (www.equitationscience.com) Refer sections: Equitation/News/Tags

Dressage Rider Training. www.dressageridertraining.com

Training articles in current Equestrian journals and magazines

 

Ground Schooling and Remedial Exercise

     

Module Code

 PCGSR4

Module Title

Ground Schooling and Remedial Exercise

Module Leader

Sarah Hollett

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Elective)

 

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

 
35 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 1.25 hours per week

 

Module Content

An understanding of the value of ground schooling and remedial exercise is fundamental to the training and rehabilitation of equines and the coaching of riders. This module aims to provide students with a detailed knowledge of the principles of ground schooling and remedial exercise for horses and an understanding of how these can be applied in practice.

Non-ridden exercise is a key element in the training of all horses and is an essential component of preparing horses to be ridden, their ongoing education and rehabilitation from injury. This module will equip students with both the practical ability to work horses from the ground and an understanding of the principles of ground schooling techniques and remedial exercise. The module will investigate a range of techniques, including but not limited to lunging, long reining and loose schooling. Students will show their ability to evaluate and reflect on individual horse development when undertaking ground schooling or remedial exercise sessions.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate and reflect on individual horse development when using ground schooling and remedial exercises in a specific context.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to competently use a practical ground schooling exercise with regard to health and safety.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of a range of ground schooling and remedial exercises.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Practical

Practical exam with oral evaluation

100%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Practical

Practical exam with oral evaluation

100%

 

Key learning resources

Bromiley, M, 2007. Equine injury, therapy and rehabilitation. 3rd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Moffett, H., 2011. Enlightened equitation: riding in true harmony with your horse. Revised ed. Paignton: Enlightened Equitation.

Williams, G., 2014. Horse movement: structure, function and rehabilitation. J.A. Allen: London.

Sutton, A., 2006. The injury free horse: hands-on methods for maintaining soundness and health. Newton Abbott: David & Charles.

Journals

  • Journal of Equine Veterinary Science
  • Equine Veterinary Education

 

Introduction to Business Management

     

Module Code

 PCBM4

Module Title

Introduction to Business Management

Module Leader

Hannah Davis

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

 

Contact Hours

35

 

Work based learning

None

Semester


Year

Lectures – 1.25 hours per week

 

Module Content

An understanding of business and management is important for any graduate entering the workforce, whether as an employee or becoming self-employed. This introduction to the world of business and management covers a wide range of contemporary topics. A wide variety of case studies are used to enhance your learning through application to real-world situations, and contextualised seminars provide an opportunity for you to relate your learning to your subject area.

You will learn what a business is and what distinguishes it from other types of organisations in the public and voluntary sector. You will gain a first insight into a business’s external environment and its main business functions, as well as into the nature of organisational structures, cultures and values.

You will be provided with an accessible introduction to financial information for business where you will learn how to read and interpret the main financial statements produced in a business, a crucial skill for any graduate.

Finally, you will go on to explore the importance of marketing in a business and how a marketing plan is put together.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Investigate the principles and standards used to produce accounting and financial information.
  2. Evaluate PESTLE analysis and its impact on a business model.
  3. Analyse various marketing concepts and create a marketing plan.
  4. Analyse and evaluate the management of internal and external workplace communications.

 

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Case study report (2,500 words)

100%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Case study report (Economics) (2,500 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Mullins, L. and Christy, G., 2016. Management and organisational behaviour. 11th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Lipsey, R. and Chrystal, K., 2015. Economics. 13th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Palmer, A. and Hartley, B., 2011. The business environment. 7th ed. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill Education.

Journals

  • Financial Times
  • Harvard Business Review

Introduction to Coaching

     

Module Code

 PCIC4

Module Title

Introduction to Coaching

Module Leader

Debbie Melville

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

 

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Level 3

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

35 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 1.25 hours per week

Module Content

This module will give students a basic understanding of the fundamentals of coaching skills in order to demonstrate progression of rider and coach performance.

The module will include practical sessions where the student is required to assess rider ability and develop progressive and structured teaching plans. In addition, the student will be required to undertake detailed health and safety risk assessments.

This module is designed to align with the BHS Stages of Teaching and thus provide students with much sought-after skills to be employable in the industry. Students will have the opportunity to engage with industry representatives and will see various methods of coaching from staff working within the industry.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Plan and deliver progressive coaching sessions.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to improve rider performance.
  3. Self-evaluate development of coaching skills.
  4. Identify a strategy for coach skills development.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Coaching Portfolio (1,500 words)

50%

Practical

Coaching Session (1 hour)

50%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Coaching Portfolio (1,500 words)

50%

Practical

Coaching Session (1 hour)

50%

Key learning resources

Anglia Ruskin University, 2017. Guide to the Harvard system of referencing. [online]. Available at:<https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm.> [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Auty, I. and Linington-Payne, M., 2011. The BHS manual for coaching and teaching riding. Updated and revised ed. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Auty, I. and Pollard, P., 2016. The power of coaching. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Bell, J. and Day, A., 2008. 101 Schooling exercises: for horse and rider. Newton Abbott: David & Charles.

British Horse Society, 2017. BHS complete horsemanship volumes 1-3. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Jago, W. and de Kunffy, C. 2001. Schooling problems solved with NLP. London: J.A.Allen.

Lilley, C., 2010. The scales of training workbook: for dressage and jumping. London: J. A. Allen.

Lush, D., 2008. Building blocks of training. London: J. A. Allen.

Moffett, H., 2011. Enlightened equitation: riding in true harmony with your horse. Revised ed. Paignton: Enlightened Equitation.

The Pony Club, 2012. Manual of horsemanship. 14th ed. Kenilworth: The Pony Club.

Troup, M., 2006. Themed lesson plans for riding instructors. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Wanless, M. 2008. Ride with your mind clinic. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Wanless, M. 2017. Rider biomechanics. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Websites:

The British Horse Society Excellence Pathway and Resource Hub (www.bhs.org.uk).

Equitation Science. (www.equitationscience.com) Refer sections: Equitation/News/Tags

Dressage Rider Training. www.dressageridertraining.com

Connected Coaches. www.connectedcoaches.org

UK Coaching (formerly Sports Coach UK) www.ukcoaching.org

Training articles in current Equestrian journals and magazines.

Practical Equine Management

     

Module Code

 PCPEM4

Module Title

Practical Equine Management

Module Leader

Kate Fuller

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (core)

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

 

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150

Contact Hours

35

Work based learning

None

Semester

1

Scheduled teaching – 2 hours per week

Visits – 7 hours

Module Content

This module will give the student a thorough grounding in equine management, both of the horse itself and equine yards. The main focus will be managing an equine competition yard, however livery yards, riding yards and racing yards will also be examined.

Students will learn through mostly practical sessions, providing opportunities for students to demonstrate applied knowledge of horse care. This will include bandaging and first aid treatments, tacking up and grooming, preparation for competition and post-competition care.

Students will also explore aspects of yard management. This will include record-keeping, such as vaccinations, worming and feed and bedding records to name a few. It is also important that students have an understanding of the importance of health and safety in the workplace. This module will serve to provide the foundation knowledge graduates will need to be employed practically in the equine sector, either as yard managers, competition grooms or technical instructors.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Demonstrate appropriate care and management of equines both pre- and post-competition.
  2. Create and explain the need for horse management records and correct health and safety procedures appropriate for managing an equine establishment.
  3. Demonstrate and explain various equine first aid treatments.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written Yard Management assignment (1,500 words)

25%

Examination

 

 

Practical

2 x Practical Examinations (45 minutes each)

75%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written Yard Management assignment (2,000 words)

50%

Examination

 

 

Practical

1 x Practical Examination (45 minutes)

50%

Key learning resources

Brega, J., 1995. The horse: foot, shoeing and lameness. London: J. A. Allen.

Brega, J., 1993. The horse: general management. London: J. A. Allen.

Boden, E. and Andrews, A., eds, 2017. Black’s student veterinary dictionary. 22nd ed. London: Bloomsbury.

Houghton Brown, J. and Clinton, M., 2010. Horse business management: managing a successful yard. 4th ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Pilliner, S., 1993. Getting horses fit: improve your horse’s performance. 2nd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Science.

Pilliner, S., 1999. Horse nutrition and feeding. 2nd ed. Oxford: Blackwell.

Smith, P., 1967. The design and construction of stables and ancillary buildings. London: J. A. Allen.

Warth, K., 2014. Design handbook for stables and equestrian buildings. London: J. A. Allen.

Study and Research Skills

   

Module Code

 PCSR4

Module Title

Study and Research Skills

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

FdA Wine Business (Core)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time (Hours)

150

Contact Hours

45

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 35 hours

Module Content

This module is designed to support students in the development of the study and research skills they will need to successfully complete their degree.

The module covers a number of key study skills including referencing, academic writing, presenting, and essential mathematical operations relevant to the student’s field of study.

The module also equips the student with an understanding of the concept of research and the reasons for undertaking research relevant to their area of study. The different stages of the research process are investigated and different types of research design discussed. Quantitative data analysis and inferential statistics are introduced.

Literature and communication:

  • Types of academic sources
  • Use of electronic search engines
  • Referencing
  • Communication skills; writing and presenting

Research methods:

  • Approaches to research
  • Developing a research question and hypothesis
  • Collecting data; design of experiments, sampling and survey design
  • Introduction into qualitative methods

Mathematical operations, data analysis and statistics:

  • A range of key mathematical operations relevant to students’ programme of study
  • Use of Microsoft Excel to record, manipulate and analyse data
  • Descriptive statistics; graphical summaries, measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • Introduction to inferential statistics; t-tests, chi-squared test

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify academic sources to support research and enquiry within their field of study and correctly reference.
  2. Design and document an appropriate method for collecting data to test a hypothesis / answer a research question.
  3. Perform mathematical operations and manipulations that are essential for their field of study.
  4. Analyse data, interpret the results and accurately communicate their findings.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio of exercises (LO1-4)

100%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio of exercises (LO1-4)

100%

 

Key learning resources

Anglia Ruskin University, 2017. Guide to the Harvard system of referencing. [online]. Available at:<https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm.> [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Braun, V. and Clarke, V., 2013. Successful qualitative research: a practical guide for beginners. London: Sage.

CETL-AURS, 2012. Engage in research. [online] Available at:< http://www.engageinresearch.ac.uk/>. [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Science.

Gustavii, B., 2017. How to write and illustrate a scientific paper. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rowntree, D., 2000. Statistics without tears: an introduction for non-mathematicians. London: Penguin Books.

 

Advanced Equitation

     

Module Code

 PCAE5

Module Title

Advanced Equitation

Module Leader

Debbie Melville

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Elective)

 

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Level 4 Equitation or BHS Stage 2 (or equivalent)

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

70 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester
 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 2.5 hours per week

 

Module Content

This module will cover advanced equitation techniques in order to develop rider skill. In-keeping with BHS Stage 2-3 examinations, students will have the opportunity to select their own route throughout this module, be it on the flat or over obstacles.

Students will develop strategies and skills for evaluating their own performance and that of the horse through the application of classical training principles throughout the task. They will learn and apply school movements and thus be expected to demonstrate these in a practical assessment.

Further to the practical taught sessions, students will engage in theory sessions examining various methods of improving rider skill, such as posture and position and developing an independent seat.

Guest lecturers will be utilised throughout the module to broaden students’ knowledge of the equitation sector.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate their own riding performance and set targets for improvement on either the flat or over fences.
  2. Examine methods of improving aspects of rider performance.
  3. Demonstrate and discuss specific school movements and their uses in training.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Equitation portfolio (2,000 words)

65%

Practical

Ridden demonstration and discussion (1 hour)

35%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Equitation portfolio (2,000 words)

65%

Practical

Ridden demonstration and discussion (1 hour)

35%

Key learning resources

Anglia Ruskin University, 2017. Guide to the Harvard system of referencing. [online]. Available at:<https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm.> [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Bell, J. and Day, A., 2008. 101 Schooling exercises: for horse and rider. Newton Abbott: David & Charles.

British Dressage, 2018. British Dressage rules for 2018.  Kenilworth: British Dressage.

British Eventing, 2018. British Eventing rules for 2018. Kenilworth: British Eventing.

British Show Jumping, 2018. British Show Jumping, rules and competitions for 2018 Kenilworth: British Show Jumping.

The British Horse Society, 2017. Ride safe: a modern approach to riding safely in all environments. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

British Horse Society, 2017. BHS complete horsemanship volumes 1-3. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

German National Equestrian Federation, 2017.The principles of riding: basic training for horse and rider. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press

Jago, W., 2006. Score more for your dressage. London: J. A. Allen.

Karl, P., 2010. The art of riding: classic dressage to high school. 2nd ed. Richmond: Cadmos.

Kottas-Heldenberg, A. and Rowbotham, J., 2010. Kottas on dressage. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Lilley, C., 2010. The dcales of training workbook: for dressage and jumping. London: J. A. Allen.

Lush, D., 2008. Building blocks of training. London: J. A. Allen.

Moffett, H., 2011. Enlightened equitation: riding in true harmony with your horse. Revised ed. Paignton: Enlightened Equitation.

The Pony Club, 2012. Manual of horsemanship. 14th ed. Kenilworth: The Pony Club.

Smiley, E., 2009. Look …no hands! Kenilworth: The Pony Club.

Stockdale, T., 2004. A young person’s guide to show jumping. Kenilworth: The Pony Club.

Papers:

McGreevy, P.D. 2007. The advent of equitation science. The Veterinary Journal. 174 pps 492-500

McLean, A. 2010. A fresh look at the Training Scale with Andrew McLean http://www.horsemagazine.com/thm/2014/12/a-fresh-look-at-the-training-scale-with-andrew-mclean/

Websites:

The British Horse Society Excellence Pathway and Resource Hub (www.bhs.org.uk).

Equitation Science. (www.equitationscience.com) Refer sections: Equitation/News/Tags

Dressage Rider Training. www.dressageridertraining.com

Training articles in current Equestrian journals and magazines

 

Business and Event Management

     

Module Code

 PCBEM5

Module Title

Business and Event Management 

Module Leader

Elise El-Hoss

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching ((Core)

 

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

35 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

2

Scheduled teaching – 2 hours per week

Visits – 7 hours

Module Content

Students studying this unit will develop an in-depth knowledge of business and event management. 

Students will plan and demonstrate the running of an equine related event (seminar, horse show, careers fair or clinic); this will include the planning of services, site management, hospitality, insurance and contingency plans.

Students will also learn about the business management skills necessary to run an event; this will include financial management, devising a marketing plan, and the legislation associated with running an event. 

Students will have the opportunity to make industry links through visiting various equine related businesses and talks from guest speakers within the industry.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Examine the business management skills needed to run an event.
  2. Demonstrate the running of an equine related event and evaluate its success.
  3. Examine current legislation needed to run an event and associated/ governing bodies.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio

50%

Examination

 

 

Practical

Management of an equine event

50%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Assignment

100%

Examination

 

 

Practical

 

 

Key learning resources:

Armstrong, G., Kotler, P. and Opresnik, M. O., 2016. Marketing: an introduction. 13th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Marsh, C., 2013. Business and financial models. London: Kogan Page.

Meerman Scott, D., 2017. The new rules of marketing and PR. 6th ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Radcliffe S., 2012. Leadership: plain and simple. 2nd ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Tate, W., 2009. The search for leadership: an organisational perspective. Axminster: Triarchy Press.

Applied Performance Training

     

Module Code

 PCAPT5

Module Title

Applied Performance Training

Module Leader

Debra Richmond

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Elective)

 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

 

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150

Contact Hours

35

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 1.25 hours per week

Module Content

Learners will be given a project horse, for which they need to produce a suitable exercise and nutrition plan. They will assess the horse for suitability for their chosen discipline and in a series of practical sessions produce the horse with a clear goal in mind demonstrating an application of training principles and prior knowledge of nutrition for the equine athlete. Learners will develop their knowledge of assessment of fitness/suitability of the horse for their chosen discipline and evaluate the physiological responses to training throughout this year-long module. 

Assessment will take the form of a written training plan, and evidence of evaluation of progress which will incorporate video evidence and the use of ICT.

Learners should take into consideration any diseases and disorders which may affect the training programme and its efficacy.

It is expected that learners will need to engage in some independent learning and training of their project horse outside of scheduled teaching hours to successfully complete this module. 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Develop and apply a training programme for a given horse.
  2. Evaluate physiological responses pre and post training plan and give evidence of a suitable nutritional plan taking into consideration diseases and disorders which could affect the training of the horse.
  3. Practically demonstrate and assess the fitness and suitability of the horse for a chosen discipline.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written training plan and evaluation

 

70%

Practical

Demonstration of assessment of fitness and suitability for discipline

30%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written training plan and evaluation

70%

Practical

Demonstration of assessment of fitness and suitability for discipline

30%

 

Key learning resources

Brega, A., 1996. The horse: fitness and competition. London: J. A. Allen.

Hodges, J., and Pilliner, S., 1993. The equine athlete: how to develop your horse’s athletic potential. Oxford: Blackwell Science.

Marlin, D., and Nankervis, K., 2002. Equine exercise physiology. Oxford: Blackwell.

Davies, Z., 2017. Equine science. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Equine Behavioural Science

   

Module Code

 PCEBS5

Module Title

Equine Behavioural Science

Module Leader

Kay Adams

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

 

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

35 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

1

Scheduled teaching – 2 hours per week

Practical – 7 hours

Module Content

Behaviour and welfare underpins all aspects of leisure and performance horse management. To work in the equine industry it is important to understand the key drivers for the behavioural responses that occur on a day-to-day basis (and less frequently). 

Learners will be able to express and justify an opinion on the public perception of the ethics of the use of horses in competition.

Learners will be able to evaluate factors which influence the welfare of the horse and undertake a pilot study relating to equine behaviour and welfare making reference to equine learning theories. 

Students will also have an opportunity to explore various management practices utilised by equine stakeholders and evaluate both positive and negative welfare states.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate the factors that influence the welfare of the horse.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of equine learning theories.
  3. Design and undertake a pilot study in the field of equine behaviour and welfare.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Pilot study

50%

Examination

Written Exam (1.5 hours)

50%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Pilot study

50%

Examination

Written Exam (1.5 hours)

50%

 

Key learning resources

Appleby, M. C., Olsson, A. S. and Galindo, F., eds. 2018. Animal welfare. 3rd ed. Wallingford: CABI.

Barnard, C., 2004. Animal behaviour: mechanism, development, ecology and evolution. Harlow: Pearson.

Martin, P. and Bateson, P., 2007. Measuring behaviour: an introductory guide. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Waran, N., ed., 2007. The welfare of horses. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Recommended journals:

  • Journal of Animal Science.
  • Journal of Equine Veterinary Science.
  • Animal Science. 
  • Applied Animal Behaviour Science.

 

Independent Enquiry

     

Module Code

 PCIE5

Module Title

Independent Enquiry

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (elective)

FdSc Wine Production (elective)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (elective)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (core)

 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Study and Research Skills (L4) or equivalent

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

1 hour

Work based learning


None

Semester

Year

 Contact hours = 3 x 20-minute project supervision tutorials.

Module Content

The Independent Enquiry module enables students to explore and research a topic of interest, relevant to their field of study. The enquiry will require the demonstration of skills acquired throughout the students’ studies, such as data collection, critical analysis and communication skills.

The student must:

·  With the support of a supervisor, agree an appropriate project title that will allow for an in-depth investigation relevant to their field of study.

·  Carry out a literature review of the subject area chosen.

·  Plan and perform an investigation.

·  Deliver a work-in-progress presentation (formative)

·  Present the results in a report form (summative)

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Present their work in progress findings, demonstrating an ability to plan their time effectively.
  2. Evaluate appropriate research and literature relating to their research aims.
  3. Use a range of established techniques to initiate and undertake critical analysis of information.
  4. Effectively communicate the findings of their independent enquiry.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Final project (3,000 words)

100%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Final project (3,000 words)

100%

 

Key learning resources

Leedy, P.D. and ormond, J. E., 2015. Practical research: planning and design. 11th ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Ridley, D., 2012. The literature review: a step-by-step guide for students2nd ed. London: Sage.

Walliman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Wisker, G., 2009. The undergraduate research handbook. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Research Methods and Statistics

 

Module Code

 PCRMS5

Module Title

Research Methods and Statistics

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

FdA Wine Business (Core)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Elective)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Study and Research Skills

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

60

Work based learning


None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 60 hours:

· Teaching to run through to Easter in Semester 2.

· Input around research proposal elements (e.g. identifying a topic and experimental design) supported by sessions run within individual programmes.

 

Module Content

The Research Methods and Statistics module builds upon content covered in the Level 4 Study and Research Skills module.

The module provides the skills required to critically evaluate research and to statistically analyse and interpret data.

The module has a strong applied and practical focus; the statistical methods are introduced through hands-on sessions using a statistical software package and one of the assessments leads to the design of a Level 6 research project proposal.

Research methods:

  • Sources of information for research and their evaluation.
  • Communication in research publications.
  • Experimental design, data collection and analysis.
  • Evaluate the importance of research.

Statistics:

  • Collecting data.
  • Exploring and summarising data.
  • Statistical analysis of data; inferential statistics and multivariate techniques.
  • Communicating statistical results.

Project design:

  • The identification of viable research problems and the selection of appropriate research strategies.
  • Writing a project proposal and plan.
  • Ethical and health and safety considerations in research.

 

Learning Outcomes 

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify a topic of investigation within your field of study and conduct a systematic literature review.
  2. Generate a written proposal for an independent investigation, incorporating an appropriate and robust research design.
  3. Select, justify and apply appropriate statistical techniques to support quantitative research.
  4. Interpret the results of statistical analysis, draw appropriate conclusions, and communicate the results effectively and accurately.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a. Research proposal (1,500 words, LO1-2)

b. Portfolio of statistical analysis, (LO3-4)

50%

50%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a. Research proposal (1,500 words, LO1-2)

b. Portfolio of statistical analysis (LO3-4)

50%

50%

 

Key learning resources

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwel.

Fowler, J., Cohen, L. and Jarvis, P., 1998. Practical statistics for field biology. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Markman, R., Markman, P. T. and Waddell, M. L., 2001. 10 steps in writing the research paper. Hauppauge: New York.

McDonald, J. H., 2014. Handbook of biological statistics. [on-line] Available at: <http://www.biostathandbook.com> [Accessed 16th September 2016].

Petrie, A. and Watson, P., 2013. Statistics for veterinary and animal science. 3rd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Ridley, D., 2012. The literature review: a step-by-step guide for students.

2nd ed. London: Sage.

Ruxton, G. F. and Colegrove, N., 2016. Experiment design for the life sciences. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Walliman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Welham, S.J., Gezan, S.A., Clark, S.J. and Mead, A., 2014. Statistical methods in biology: Design and analysis of experiments and regression. Boca Raton: CRC Press.

Plus GenStat Teaching & Learning on-line help and guides, accessible from within the software and online.

Skills for Coaching Competition Riders

   

Module Code

 PCCR5

Module Title

Skills for Coaching Competition Riders

Module Leader

Debbie Melville

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

 

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

Introduction to Coaching

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

70 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 2.5 hours per week  

Additional contact hours may be required in the form of visits and guest speakers, these will be within timetable where possible.

Module Content

This module will build upon the knowledge gained in Introduction to Coaching and will enable students to develop a broad range of skills for coaching riders engaging in competitive disciplines.

It will cover how to assess and evaluate rider and horse needs in order to produce progressive plans to demonstrate the progression of rider, horse and coach performance.

The module has an emphasis on self-reflection, a skill which is encouraged and developed throughout practical opportunities to practice coaching skills and thus identify areas for improvement. Students will then be expected to be able to suggest ways in which they can work on these improvements, with their own individual goals in mind.

The majority of the sessions will be practical based, with theory sessions aligned to support the practical content and develop academic skills in context.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Plan progressive coaching sessions for riders engaging in competition.
  2. Deliver progressive coaching sessions for competition riders.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to improve rider and horse performance.
  4. Self-evaluate personal coaching skills.
  5. Construct a strategy for coach skills development utilising evidence based analysis from existing pedagogies.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Coaching Portfolio

50%

Practical

Coaching Session

50%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Coaching Portfolio

50%

Practical

Coaching Session

50%

 

Key learning resources

Anglia Ruskin University, 2017. Guide to the Harvard system of referencing. [online]. Available at:<https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm.> [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Auty, I. and Linington-Payne, M., 2011. The BHS Manual for Coaching and Teaching riding. Updated and revised ed. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Auty, I. and Pollard, P., 2016. The power of coaching. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Bell, J. and Day, A., 2008. 101 schooling exercises: for horse and rider. Newton Abbott: David & Charles.

British Dressage, 2018. British Dressage rules for 2018.  Kenilworth: British Dressage.

British Eventing, 2018. British Eventing rules for 2018. Kenilworth: British Eventing.

British Show Jumping, 2018. British Show Jumping: rules and competitions for 2018 Kenilworth: British Show Jumping.

British Horse Society, 2017. BHS complete horsemanship volumes 1-3. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Jago, W. and de Kunffy, C. 2001. Schooling problems solved with NLP. London: J.A. Allen.

Lilley, C., 2010. The Scales of training workbook: for dressage and jumping. London: J. A. Allen.

Lush, D., 2008. Building blocks of training. London: J. A. Allen.

Moffett, H., 2011. Enlightened equitation: riding in true harmony with your horse. Revised ed. Paignton: Enlightened Equitation.

The Pony Club, 2012. Manual of horsemanship. 14th ed. Kenilworth: The Pony Club.

Troup, M., 2006. Themed lesson plans for riding instructors. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press.

Wanless, M. 2008. Ride with your mind clinic. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press

Wanless, M. 2017. Rider biomechanics. Shrewsbury: Kenilworth Press

 

Websites:

The British Horse Society Excellence Pathway and Resource Hub (www.bhs.org.uk).

Equitation Science. (www.equitationscience.com) Refer sections: Equitation/News/Tags

Dressage Rider Training. www.dressageridertraining.com

Connected Coaches. www.connectedcoaches.org

UK Coaching (formerly Sports Coach UK) www.ukcoaching.org

Training articles in current Equestrian journals and magazines.

 

Work Placement

   

Module Code

 PCWP5

Module Title

Work Placement

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

10

Work based learning

150 hours

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 10 hours, consisting:

-  Launch lectures

-  Group and individual support tutorials

Module Content

Students will take part in a work placement relevant to their field of study, comprising 150 hours of work-based learning. This will be an invaluable opportunity to learn more about their area of interest, whilst establishing industry contacts in a professional environment. Upon completion of the placement students will be required to compile a report, evaluating the knowledge and skills developed therein.

·  Selection and organisation of work placement or employer-led project, including meeting health and safety requirements, in a relevant sector.

·  Completion of work placement or employer-led project.

·  Development of both subject-specific skills and work-related skills such as numeracy, communication, interpersonal/teamwork, self-management and skills necessary for self-managed and lifelong learning.

·  Identify incidences that occurred during the work placement that were significant relevant to the subject area and evaluate their importance.

·  Submit a report that evidences the learning outcomes.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Appraise, and justify the selection of, their workplace provider.
  2. Analyse how the knowledge and skills gained in their studies have impacted upon their work placement.
  3. Evaluate the knowledge and skills developed whilst on work placement.
  4. Identify and evaluate a critical incident relevant to the area of study that occurred during the work placement.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Placement report (LO1-LO3)

70%

 

Presentation (LO4)

30%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Placement report (LO1-LO4)

100%

 

Key learning resources

Fanthome, C., 2004. Work placements: a survival guide for students. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

McCabe, M., 2014. How to get an internship or work placement. North Charleston: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Herbert, I. and Rothwell, A., 2004. Managing your placement: a skills-based approach. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

 

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