Foundation Degree (validated by the Royal Agricultural University)

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What does the course cover? 

The FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation programme enables you to gain a thorough knowledge and understanding of the established principles of Animal Behaviour, Welfare and Conservation and their development within industry. The programme also enables you to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles of business management and apply this in a relevant work related context. An ability to apply underlying concepts and principles outside the context in which they were first studied, and employ those principles in Animal-related industries or other work-relevant context, will allow you to gain the experience required for future careers.

You’ll benefit from working with our wide range of species including aquatics, companion large animals, exotics and small mammals in the Animal Management Centre, gaining experience in handling and management experience. This programme incorporates key business skills, providing you with the sound skills and knowledge that you’ll need.

We have excellent links with the industry, and host regular guest speakers and visits to other centres, including a visit to Mankwe Wildlife Reserve, South Africa, as part of the Wildlife Conservation module. You'll be able to discover 3000 large mammals on the reserve, which is made up of 42 species plus over 250 types of bird, plus a wide variety of amphibians, invertebrates and reptiles.

Entry Requirements:
  • Minimum age: 18
  • GCSE: 5 x GCSE (C/4) including English, Maths and Science
  • A-level: CD (of which at least 1 STEM-related subject)
  • BTEC: MMP (of which at least 1 STEM-related subject)
  • International Baccalaureate: 24
  • IELTS (for students with English as a second language): Level 6.5 overall with Level 6.0 in writing
  • Other: Access to HE Diploma in Science

Duration:

Full-time: 2 years

Part-time: 4 years 

UCAS Details:

The UCAS code for this course is P300.

Costs:

For the academic year 2018/19 the tuition fees for UK and EU students are:

  • Full-time £8,000
  • Part-time £4,000

Facilities

Our Animal Management unit caters to all kinds of animals, enabling students to explore several areas of interest. Major recent developments within the unit include a new dog grooming unit, plus areas specialising in small mammals, birds of prey, cold and tropical aquatics, and our exotics with a wide range of amphibian, reptiles and snakes. Plumpton also has an 800-hectare farm that has a range of livestock including cows, horses, pigs and sheep.

The department also houses modern and fully-equipped laboratories which are an excellent location for animal science experiments and behaviour studies. Some of our equipment includes a digital binocular compound microscopes, HPLC and electrophoresis equipment, and a PCR Thermocycler. This enables students to learn and experience the practical elements of animal science in a safe and stimulating environment.

Library

The library facilities at Plumpton located in the centre of the College campus. There is plenty of space for quiet study and plugs at every desk. The library has extensive computer facilities to support student research and there is also easy access to printers. The library is staffed by the library manager and library assistants.

There are over 10,000 books on land-based subjects, plus a range of magazines and journals, including electronic resources that may be accessed from College or home. The library stocks specialist material that covers a broad range of animal management, conservation and veterinary science subjects to facilitate students in their assignments and research projects. Students also have access to subject-specific e-journals and e-publications.

I.T. Resources

We have a dedicated Higher Education I.T. room here at Plumpton, providing reliable access to a quiet study space and printing facilities.

Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is based on the programme Moodle. It is used daily by both staff and students to ensure that we adhere to the College aim of using modern technology to help support outstanding teaching, learning and assessment at college. Staff are encouraged to empower their students through the use of digital tools both in and outside the classroom. For example, they can provide support before a lesson by uploading lecture slides onto the module page. Digital enhancement can be conducted in a variety of ways during a lesson, such as encouraging student interaction through the use of Virtual Reality. Meanwhile, post-lesson enrichment can come in the form of a lesson-review quiz. Students must also submit assignments online via Turnitin, allowing staff to provide accessible and detailed digital feedback.

HE Study Rooms

HE students have access to their own study rooms that is for the sole use of HE students. The rooms are located in the Research & Development building, and creates a quiet self-study environment for students. Additionally, there is also a dedicated HE common room designed to provide students with a space to relax and engage with other HE students.

Future Opportunities

Through an increased awareness of animal welfare, there are certainly lots of opportunities for a career in welfare organisations and animal collections. You'll also develop further employable skills through both work placement and business modules. During this time, you'll have the opportunity to work alongside animal management and welfare specialists; gaining additional first-hand experience. 

*Please note that this programme is subject to validation by the Royal Agricultural University for September 2019 entry.*

Modules

Level 4 Modules

Animal Biology

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCAB4

Module Title

Animal Biology

Module Leader

Donna Green

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

30 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

 

64 hours

 

Work based learning

 

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 54 hours

Practical – 10 hours

 

Module Content

Animal Biology will introduce students to a number of themes and concepts that will be of use to them throughout their programme. The module will cover cell structures, organ structures, organ functions, and system functions from a number of animals such as cats, dogs and exotic birds. Students will be required to learn and reproduce this information in the form of an end-of-module written examination.

Students will learn about the basic chemical structures and functions of common biological components (including amino acids, proteins, enzymes, lipids, nucleic acids), cell structure and functions of cell organelles, specialised cell types, structure and function of cell and tissues including skin, hair and associated glands, and the correct positioning and composition of the main veins found in small animals.

The structure of various bodily systems will be discussed in the context of their functions and importance, including: the lymphatic system; the cardiovascular system (including characteristics and functions of blood vessels, composition and functions of blood, transport of materials around the body, identification of associated disease of the circulatory system); the respiratory system (including movement of respiratory gases in, out and around the body, identification of associated disease of the respiratory system); the urinary system (including its role in regulating body fluids, and identification of associated disease of the urinary system); the digestive system (including each organ, action of digestive secretions and processes on dietary constituents, properties and functions of macronutrients, micronutrients, and dietary sources for a range of species); the nervous system (including sense organs, initiation and transmission of nerve impulses and conduction across the synapse, co-ordination of the body in terms of sensory, integrative and motor functions of the nervous system); and the endocrine system (including homeostatic regulation of glucose levels and body temperature).

Central to animal biology is an understanding of the characteristics of body structure of a range of invertebrates and vertebrates. To this end, students will learn about anatomical segmentation and body cavity boundaries, common anatomical planes, directions and terminology, and the structure and function of bones and vertebrates skeletal systems (including detailed knowledge and anatomical landmarks of the skull, spine and thoracic skeleton, characteristics of joints and movement, tendons and ligaments and structure of muscle and process of muscle contraction), with a particular focus on cats, dogs and exotics. Students will also examine the structure of the mammalian reproductive systems, hormonal control of reproduction, the process of fertilisation and development of foetus, and of parturition and lactation.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Describe the chemical structure and function of biological macromolecules and their influence on the structure and function of cells and tissues.
  2. Explain the structure and function of transport systems, to include circulatory, lymphatic, hepatic and systemic systems.
  3. Explain how animals obtain materials for respiration and excretion of waste.
  4. Describe the structure and function of organs associated with the digestive tract and their roles in the digestive processes, to include, mono-gastric, ruminant, carnivore and herbivore; and nutrients and dietary requirements for a range of species.
  5. Evaluate the structure and function of the support and movement of animal bodies.
  6. Explain the male and female reproductive systems, hormonal control, and process of fertilisation, embryo development, parturition and lactation, to include, mammal, bird and fish.
  7. Explain the roles of the nervous and endocrine systems in regulation and coordination of the animal body.

 

First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

4 x 1-hour closed-book examinations (Learning Outcomes 1-7)

25% per examination

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

4 x 1-hour closed-book examinations (Learning Outcomes 1-7)

25% per examination

Key learning resources

Aspinall, V. and Capello, M., 2015. Introduction to veterinary anatomy and physiology. 3rd ed. London: Elsevier.

Colville, T. P. and Bassert, J. M., 2015. Clinical anatomy and physiology for veterinary technicians. 3rd ed. London: Elsevier.

Reece, W. O., 2017. Functional anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. 5th ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Sadava, D., Hillis, D. M., Heller, H. C. and Berenbaum, M., 2016. Life: the science of biology. 11th ed. New York, NY: WH Freeman.

Tortora, G. J. and Derrickson, B. H., 2014. Principles of anatomy and physiology. 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Interactive sites:

thelifewire.com.

‘Vetlogic’ interactive software titles

Introduction to Business Management

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCBM4

Module Title

Introduction to Business Management

Module Leader

Hannah Davis

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

 

 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

 

Contact Hours

35

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

1

Lectures – 28 hours

Contextualised seminars – 7 hours

 

Module Content

An understanding of business and management is important for any graduate entering the workforce, whether as an employee or becoming self-employed. This introduction to the world of business and management covers a wide range of contemporary topics. A wide variety of case studies are used to enhance your learning through application to real-world situations, and contextualised seminars provide an opportunity for you to relate your learning to your subject area.

You will learn what a business is and what distinguishes it from other types of organisations in the public and voluntary sector. You will gain a first insight into a business’s external environment and its main business functions, as well as into the nature of organisational structures, cultures and values.

You will be provided with an accessible introduction to financial information for business where you will learn how to read and interpret the main financial statements produced in a business, a crucial skill for any graduate.

Finally, you will go on to explore the importance of marketing in a business and how a marketing plan is put together.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Investigate the principles and standards used to produce accounting and financial information.
  2. Evaluate PESTLE analysis and its impact on a business model.
  3. Analyse various marketing concepts and create a marketing plan.
  4. Analyse and evaluate the management of internal and external workplace communications.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Case study report (2,500 words)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Case study report (Economics) (2,500 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Mullins, L. and Christy, G., 2016. Management and organisational behaviour. 11th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Lipsey, R. and Chrystal, K., 2015. Economics. 13th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Palmer, A. and Hartley, B., 2011. The business environment. 7th ed. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill Education.

Journals

  • Financial Times
  • Harvard Business Review

Study and Research Skills

AQSC Approval date: 14 August 2018 

Module Code

PCSR4

Module Title

Study and Research Skills

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

FdA Wine Business (Core)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time (Hours)

150

Contact Hours

45

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

Module Content

This module is designed to support students in the development of the study and research skills they will need to successfully complete their degree.

The module covers a number of key study skills including referencing, academic writing, presenting, and essential mathematical operations relevant to the student’s field of study.

The module also equips the student with an understanding of the concept of research and the reasons for undertaking research relevant to their area of study. The different stages of the research process are investigated and different types of research design discussed. Quantitative data analysis and inferential statistics are introduced.

Literature and communication:

  • Types of academic sources
  • Use of electronic search engines
  • Referencing
  • Communication skills; writing and presenting

Research methods:

  • Approaches to research
  • Developing a research question and hypothesis
  • Collecting data; design of experiments, sampling and survey design
  • Introduction into qualitative methods

Mathematical operations, data analysis and statistics:

  • A range of key mathematical operations relevant to students’ programme of study
  • Use of Microsoft Excel to record, manipulate and analyse data
  • Descriptive statistics; graphical summaries, measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • Introduction to inferential statistics; t-tests, chi-squared test

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify academic sources to support research and enquiry within their field of study and correctly reference.
  2. Design and document an appropriate method for collecting data to test a hypothesis / answer a research question.
  3. Perform mathematical operations and manipulations that are essential for their field of study.
  4. Analyse data, interpret the results and accurately communicate their findings.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio of exercises (LO1-4)

100%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio of exercises (LO1-4)

100%

Key learning resources

Anglia Ruskin University, 2017. Guide to the Harvard system of referencing. [online]. Available at:<https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm.> [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Braun, V. and Clarke, V., 2013. Successful qualitative research: a practical guide for beginners. London: Sage.

CETL-AURS, 2012. Engage in research. [online] Available at:< http://www.engageinresearch.ac.uk/>. [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Science.

Gustavii, B., 2017. How to write and illustrate a scientific paper. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rowntree, D., 2000. Statistics without tears: an introduction for non-mathematicians. London: Penguin Books.

Management of Animal Collections

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCMAC4

Module Title

Management of Animal Collections

Module Leader

Shonna McMillan

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

 

40 hours

 

Work based learning

 

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 18 hours

Practicals – 16 hours

Visits – 6 hours

Module Content

This core module will be taught through a variety of methods (scheduled teaching hours, practical sessions and visits), and will enable students to establish a knowledge of the environment, exercise and enrichment needs of a number of animal species. It will allow students to attain supervisory skills and involve themselves in the management of an animal collection, taking into account staffing and budget management.  Students will be required to present their findings from this module to members of the public, in the form of an assessed presentation.

In this module students will learn methods of handling, restraint, transporting and management of a variety of species, undertake and follow risk assessment in the workplace and evaluate their effectiveness with current legislation, discuss different species-specific methods to maintain their environment, exercise and enrichment needs, undertake responsibility for supervising workers in an animal collection (including managing budgets, advertisement and stock management), and undertake a presentation to members of the public.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Safely handle, restrain, transport and manage a variety of species within animal collections.
  2. Undertake risk assessments within an animal collection and evaluate their effectiveness in line with current legislation.
  3. Evaluate the importance of maintaining the environmental, exercise and enrichment needs for a variety of species within a selection of animal collections.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to manage staff, budgets, advertisement and stock management.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to interact with the public during the College Open Day and evaluate own performance.

 


First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,000 words

(Learning Outcomes 2, 3 and 4)

50%

Examination

 

 

Practical

Presentation at College Open Day (Learning Outcome 5)

Practical assessment

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 4)

30%

 

20%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,000 words

(Learning Outcomes 2, 3 and 4)

50%

Examination

 

 

Practical

Presentation

(Learning Outcome 5)

Practical assessment

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 4)

30%

 

20%

Key learning resources

Meredith, A. and Delaney, C. J., 2010. Manual of exotic pets. 5th ed. Gloucester: BSAVA.

Ekarius, C., 2004. How to build animal housing. North Adams, MA: Storey Books.

Hosey, G., Melfi, V. and Pankhurst, S., 2013. Zoo animals: behaviour, management and welfare. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Judah, V. and Nuttall, K., 2016. Exotic animal care and management. 2nd ed. Boston: Cengage Learning.

Rosenthal, K., Forbes, N., Frye, F. L. and Lewbart, G. A., 2008. Rapid review of small exotic animal medicine and husbandry. New Jersey: CRC Press.

Sinek, S., 2017. Leaders eat last: why some teams pull together and others don’t. Portfolio Penguin: London.

Health and Welfare

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCHW4

Module Title

Health and Welfare

Module Leader

Donna Green

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

30 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

One

Scheduled teaching –  26 hours

Visits – 4 hours

Module Content

Health and Welfare focuses on ensuring that students can recognise signs of health and ill heath in a number of animal species, whilst also covering possible treatment methods, such as the use of antibiotics and vaccination. Students will learn about current animal welfare legislations and what it means for a number of different roles and species within the animal management industry. Upon completion of the module students will feel comfortable discussing various causes of disease amongst animals, and will be able to suggest suitable methods of treatment, control and prevention.

Students will evaluate the factors that contribute to good husbandry practice and techniques available for monitoring the health of livestock. In the context of monitoring animal health, students will learn to recognise signs of health and ill health in a range of animal species, principles and practices of safe animal transport and related documentation, infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and fungi, and routes of disease transmission and measures undertaken to prevent disease transmission (including quarantine, isolation, hygiene, the use of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance and immunity and vaccination). 

Students will recognise the significance of measuring behaviour in relation to physiological and psychological stress and will evaluate strategies to manage abnormal behaviour. Students will place this knowledge in the context of current animal welfare legislation, including its role in animal management and its effectiveness.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate the factors for promoting and maintaining animal health.
  2. Demonstrate critical knowledge of the various causes of disease and investigate suitable methods of treatment, control and prevention.
  3. Evaluate the usefulness of measuring behaviour in relation to physiological and psychological stress.
  4. Identify current animal welfare legislation and investigate its effectiveness in the protection of animals.


First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 3 and 4)

50%

Examination

Closed-book examination – 1 hour

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 3 and 4)

50%

Examination

Closed-book examination – 1 hour

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

50%

Key learning resources

Ackerman, N., 2016. Aspinall’s complete textbook of veterinary nursing. 3rd ed. London: Elsevier. 

Girling, S., J., 2013. Veterinary nursing of exotic pets. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Hosey, G., Melfi, V. and Pankhurst, S., 2013. Zoo animals: behaviour, management and welfare. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Judah, V. and Nuttall, K., 2016. Exotic animal care and management. 2nd ed. Boston: Cengage Learning.

Journals:

·  Animal Welfare

Organisations:

·  Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW)

Websites:

·  www.legislation.gov.uk

 

Principles of Conservation

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCPC4

Module Title

Principles of Conservation

Module Leader

Lesley Barcock

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

30 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

Two

Scheduled teaching – 30 hours

 

Module Content

This module will enable students to explore the underlying principles of ecology, investigate the various different forms of conservation, and explore the biological relationship between a species and its environment. Upon completion of this module, students will be able to explain the difference between different forms of conservation and how they affect different species. This knowledge will be assessed through a number of programme work projects.

In this module, students will demonstrate understanding of the underlying principles of ecology through investigating different forms of conservation, including breeding programmes, in situ and ex situ conservation, re-introductions, rewilding and micromanagement, and evaluating the biological relationship between an individual organism or an individual species and its environment.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the underlying principles of ecology that underpin conservation.
  2. Evaluate the different forms of conservation and their effectiveness to animal and human populations.
  3. Apply conservation principles and concepts to an autecological case study.


First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 3)

50%

 

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 3)

100%

Key learning resources

Brodie, J.F., Post, E.S. and Doak, D. F., eds, 2012. Wildlife conservation in a changing climate. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 

Chapman, J.L. and Reiss, M.J., 1998.  Ecology: principles and applications. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hambler, C. and Canney, S. M., 2013. Conservation. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Mill, L.S., 2012. Conservation of wildlife populations: demography, genetics, and management. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Macdonald, D.W. and Feber, R.E., eds, 2015. Wildlife conservation on farmland: volume 2 conflict in the countryside. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Journals:

·  Biological Conservation

·  Journal of Applied Ecology

·  Forest Ecology and Management Journal

Animal Behaviour and Conservation

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCABC4

Module Title

Animal Behaviour and Communication

Module Leader

Lesley Barcock

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

Level 4

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time



150 hours

Contact Hours

 

30 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

One

Scheduled teaching – 30 hours

 

Module Content

Animal Behaviour and Communication is a core module at Level 4, which enables students to investigate the principles of animal communication, and the importance of species-specific communication. In order to do so students will review the historical basis of animal behaviour studies and how these are applied in the modern day, before focusing more specifically, on how different means of communication enable species to adapt to their own environment.

Students will explore the historical basis for the study of animal behaviour and theories regarding animal learning and development, and the current application of animal behaviour studies to practical animal management.

In order to understand this historical context and current applications, students will learn about the principles underpinning classical and operant conditioning, habituation, sensitivity, insight and cognition, as well as species-specific communication and its development (including modalities of communication and the honesty and reliability of signalling).

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

1.  Evaluate the scientific and historical basis of animal behaviour studies and their current application.

2.  Display a critical understanding of the principles underlying learning, including imprinting and sensitive periods.

3.  Analyse the role of different forms of communication that enable species to adapt to their needs and environment.

 

First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

A1 Poster presentation

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 3)

50%

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

A1 Poster presentation

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 3)

50%

50%

Key learning resources:

Alcock, J., 2013. Animal behaviour: an evolutionary approach. 10th ed. Cary, NC: Sinauer.

Drickamer, L., Vessey, S. and Jakob, E., 2001. Animal behaviour:  mechanisms, ecology and evolution. 5th ed. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill.

McFarland, D., 1999. Animal behaviour: psychobiology, ethology and evolution. 3rd ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Manning, P. and Dawkins, A., 2012. Introduction to animal behaviour. 6th ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Martin, B. and Bateson, P., 2007. Measuring behaviour: an introductory guide. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Searcy, W.A. and Nowicki, S., 2005. The evolution of communication: reliability and deception in signalling systems. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Slater, P.J.B., 2010. Essentials of animal behaviour. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Stegmann, U.E. ed., 2013. Animal communication theory: information and influence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Journals:

·  Journal of Animal Behaviour

·  Journal of Zoology

·  Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition

·  Nature

·  New Scientist

 

Level 5 Modules


Work Placement

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWP5

Module Title

Work Placement

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

30 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time


300 hours

Contact Hours

10

Work based learning 

150 hours

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 10 hours, consisting:

-  Launch lectures

-  Group and individual support tutorials

 

Module Content

Students will take part in a work placement relevant to their field of study, comprising 150 hours of work-based learning. This will be an invaluable opportunity to learn more about their area of interest, whilst establishing industry contacts in a professional environment. Upon completion of the placement students will be required to compile a report, evaluating the knowledge and skills developed therein.

Students will select and organise a work placement or employer-led project, including meeting health and safety requirements, in a relevant sector, and will be required to complete the work placement or employer-led project. In doing so, students will develop both subject-specific skills and work-related skills such as numeracy, communication, interpersonal/teamwork, self-management and skills necessary for self-managed and lifelong learning.

After completion of the work placement or employer-led project, students will identify incidences that occurred during the work placement that were significant relevant to the subject area and evaluate their importance. Finally, students will complete and submit a report that evidences the learning outcomes.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Appraise, and justify the selection of, their workplace provider.
  2. Analyse how the knowledge and skills gained in their studies have impacted upon their work placement.
  3. Evaluate the knowledge and skills developed whilst on work placement.
  4. Identify and evaluate a critical incident relevant to the area of study that occurred during the work placement.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Placement report (LO1-LO3)

70%

 

Presentation (LO4)

30%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Placement report (LO1-LO4)

100%

Key learning resources

Fanthome, C., 2004. Work placements: a survival guide for students. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

McCabe, M., 2014. How to get an internship or work placement. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Herbert, I. and Rothwell, A., 2004. Managing your placement: a skills-based approach. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

Independent Enquiry

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCIE5

Module Title

Independent Enquiry

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (core)

FdSc Wine Production (elective)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour & Conservation (core)

 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Study and Research Skills (L4) or equivalent

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

2 hours group tutorial

1 hour supervision

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

 

Contact hours = 3 x 20 minute project supervision tutorials.

 

Module Content

The Independent Enquiry module enables students to explore and research a topic of interest, relevant to their field of study. The enquiry will require the demonstration of skills acquired throughout the students’ studies, such as data collection, critical analysis and communication skills.

With the support of a supervisor, the student must agree an appropriate project title that will allow for an in-depth investigation relevant to their field of study, carry out a literature review of the subject area chosen, plan and perform an investigation, deliver a work-in-progress presentation (formative), and finally present the results in a report form (summative).

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Present their work in progress findings, demonstrating an ability to plan their time effectively.
  2. Evaluate appropriate research and literature relating to their research aims.
  3. Use a range of established techniques to initiate and undertake critical analysis of information.
  4. Effectively communicate the findings of their independent enquiry.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Final project (3,000 words)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Final project (3,000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Leedy, P.D. and Ormond, J. E., 2015. Practical research: planning and Design. 11th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Ridley, D., 2012. The literature review: a step-by-step guide for students. 2nd ed. London: Sage.

Walliman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Wisker, G., 2009. The undergraduate research handbook. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Research Methods and Statistics

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCRMS5

Module Title

Research Methods and Statistics

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

FdA Wine Business (Elective)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Elective)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Study and Research Skills

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

60

Work based learning


None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 60 hours:

·  Teaching to run through to Easter in Semester 2.

·  Input around research proposal elements (e.g. identifying a topic and experimental design) supported by sessions run within individual programmes.

 

Module Content

The Research Methods and Statistics module builds upon content covered in the Level 4 Study and Research Skills module.

The module provides the skills required to critically evaluate research and to statistically analyse and interpret data.

The module has a strong applied and practical focus; the statistical methods are introduced through hands-on sessions using a statistical software package and one of the assessments leads to the design of a Level 6 research project proposal.

Students will learn about several aspects of research methods (including sources of information for research and their evaluation, communication in research publications, experimental design, data collection and analysis, evaluate the importance of research), statistics (including collecting data, exploring and summarising data, statistical analysis of data, inferential statistics and multivariate techniques, and communicating statistical results), and project design (including the identification of viable research problems and the selection of appropriate research strategies, writing a project proposal and plan, and ethical and health and safety considerations in research).

 

Learning Outcomes 

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify a topic of investigation within your field of study and conduct a systematic literature review.
  2. Generate a written proposal for an independent investigation, incorporating an appropriate and robust research design.
  3. Select, justify and apply appropriate statistical techniques to support quantitative research.
  4. Interpret the results of statistical analysis, draw appropriate conclusions, and communicate the results effectively and accurately.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a. Research proposal (1,500 words, LO1-2)

b. Portfolio of statistical analysis, (LO3-4)

50%

 

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a. Research proposal (1,500 words, LO1-2)

b. Portfolio of statistical analysis (LO3-4)

50%

 

50%

Key learning resources

Bryman, A. and Bell, E. 2015. Business Research Methods.

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Fowler, J., Cohen, L. and Jarvis, P., 1998. Practical statistics for field biology. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Markman, R., Markman, P. T. and Waddell, M. L., 2001. 10 steps in writing the research paper. Hauppauge: New York.

McDonald, J. H., 2014. Handbook of biological statistics. [on-line] Available at: <http://www.biostathandbook.com> [Accessed 16th September 2016].

Petrie, A. and Watson, P., 2013. Statistics for veterinary and animal science. 3rd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Ridley, D., 2012. The literature review: a step-by-step guide for students. 2nd ed. London: Sage.

Ruxton, G. F. and Colegrove, N., 2016. Experiment design for the life sciences. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Walliman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Welham, S.J., Gezan, S.A., Clark, S.J. and Mead, A., 2014. Statistical methods in biology: Design and analysis of experiments and regression. Boca Raton: CRC Press.

Plus GenStat Teaching & Learning on-line help and guides, accessible from within the software and online.

Applied Sampling Methods in Conservation

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCASM5

Module Title

Applied Sampling Methods in Conservation

Module Leader

Lesley Barcock/ James Clapham

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

30 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

One

Scheduled teaching – 10 hours

Practicals – 20 hours

 

Module Content

This module will provide students with a grounding of knowledge in the use of laboratory skills to effectively report findings from field studies. Students will be expected to adhere to Health and Safety regulations as they complete a set of four, equally assessed laboratory reports throughout the programme of the module.

Students will demonstrate the ability to collect and analyse a range of samples in the field using safe practice and underpinning knowledge, a range of laboratory skills adhering to Health and Safety, and the ability to effectively report findings from field studies and laboratory analysis.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Develop skills in field sample collection and analysis.
  2. Develop skills in a range of key laboratory techniques commonly used in the biochemical analysis of animal samples.
  3. Effectively report and evaluate findings from field and laboratory analysis, applying underpinning knowledge and understanding.


First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Laboratory report – 1,500 words

Laboratory report – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1-3)

50%

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Laboratory report – 1,500 words

Laboratory report – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1-3)

50%

50%

Key learning resources:

Berg, J. M., Tymoczko, J.L., Gatto, G. J. and Stryer, L., 2015. Biochemistry. 8th ed. New York, NY: Freeman and Company.

Chapman, J.L. and Reiss, M.J., 1998.  Ecology: principles and applications. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jones, A., Reed, R. and Weyers, J., 2016. Practical skills in biology. 6th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Henderson, P.A., 2010. Practical methods in ecology. Oxford: Blackwell.

Reed, R., Holmes, D., Weyers, J. and Jones, A., 2016. Practical skills in biomolecular science. 5th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Wheater, C.P., Bell, J. R. and Cook, P. A., 2011. Practical field ecology: a project guide. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Wilson, K. and Walker, J., 2010. Principles and techniques of biochemistry and molecular biology. 7th ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

Applied Animal Behaviour Management

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCABM5

Module Title

Applied Animal Behaviour Management

Module Leader

Donna Green

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

 
30 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

Two

Scheduled teaching – 26 hours

Practicals – 4 hours

 

Module Content

This module will provide students with the opportunity to apply and develop the knowledge and skills acquired in Animal Behaviour and Communication.  Students will employ these skills in assessing behaviour and welfare as well as the management of behavioural problems in specific case study scenarios.

In this module, students will apply their knowledge of animal behaviour and communication to understand behavioural indicators of animal welfare, including behavioural observation and comparison, choice and preference testing, behavioural priorities, and quantifying importance for animals. Students will evaluate the use of classical and operant conditioning within behaviour modification, and the differing attitudes and perceptions of human-animal interactions.

By applying their understanding of learning theory, animal welfare, and human-animal interactions, students will examine the possible causes and symptoms of a variety of common behaviour problems and appropriate strategies in modifying them, possible medical causes of abnormal behaviours, case studies of common problems, and discuss on the variety of options available for appropriate management.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the use of learning processes in behaviour modification.
  2. Assess and interpret behavioural indicators of animal welfare.
  3. Apply suitable solutions to animal behaviour problems.


First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written essay – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 2 and 3)

50%

Examination

Closed-book exam – 1 hour

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written essay – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 2 and 3)

50%

Examination

Closed-book exam – 1 hour

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

50%

Key learning resources:

Carlson, N. R. and Birkett, M. A., 2016. Physiology of behaviour. 12th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Domjan, M., 2014. The principles of learning and behavior. 7th ed. London: Wadsworth.

Goodenough, J. E., Mcguire, B. and Jakob, E., 2010. Perspectives on animal behaviour. 3rd ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Horwitz, D. and Mills, D. S., 2010. BSAVA manual of canine and feline behavioural medicine. 2nd ed. Gloucester: BSAVA.

Jensen, P., 2017. The ethology of domestic animals: an introductory text. 2nd ed. Wallingford: CABI.

Martin, G. L. and Pear, J., 2016. Behaviour modification: what it is and how to do it. 10th ed. Abingdon: Routledge.

Robinson, I., ed., 1995. The Waltham book of human-animal interactions: benefits and responsibilities of pet ownership. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

Journals:

·  Applied Animal Behaviour Science

·  The Behavioural and Brain Sciences

·  Animal Behaviour

·  Physiology and Behaviour

·  Animal Welfare

Welfare and Ethics

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWE5

Module Title

Welfare and Ethics

Module Leader

Jenny Watkins

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

30 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

One

Scheduled teaching – 30 hours

 

Module Content

With animal welfare and ethics being a prevalent topic in modern-day society, this module enables students to investigate the factors affecting human attitudes to animals, how these have changed over time, and how legislature has changed alongside them. Students will be encouraged to look into the past, present and future regarding these ethical debates, in order to evaluate how humankind impacts on animal welfare.

Students will explore various concepts of animal welfare and ethics, factors influencing human perceptions and attitudes to animals, how animals have been used by society through history, the current roles of animals in society, and factors influencing the changing roles of animals. Using their knowledge of animal behaviour, students will review legal and ethical debates regarding the treatment of animals, and investigate the conflict between morality and animal law. Finally, current issues will be discussed in depth, including animals in sport, companion animals, speciesism, wild animals in captivity, sentience, illegal trade, genetics, and research.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate the changing roles of animals in human society over time.
  2. Analyse and describe human perceptions of animals.
  3. Analyse and evaluate human impact on current issues concerning animal welfare.


First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 3,000 words

(Learning Outcomes 1-3)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 3,000 words

(Learning Outcomes 1-3)

100%

Key learning resources

Appleby, M., 1999. What should we do about animal welfare? Oxford: Blackwell Science.

Appleby, M. C., Olsson, A. S. and Galindo, F., 2018. Animal welfare, 3rd ed. Wallingford: CABI.

Armstrong, S. J. and Botzler, R. G., eds, 2017. The animal ethics reader. 3rd ed. Abingdon: Routledge.

Bostock, S. T. C., 2004. Zoos and animal rights: the ethics of keeping animals. Abingdon: Routledge.

Dawkins, M., 2013. Animal suffering: the science of animal welfare. London: Springer.

Garner, R., 2004. Animals, politics and morality, 2nd ed. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Radford, M., 2001. Animal welfare law in Britain: regulation and responsibility. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Serpell, J., 1996. In the company of animals: a history of human-animal relationships. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Journals:

·  Animal Welfare

Animal Welfare Organisations:

·  Universities Federation for Animal Welfare

·  RSPCA

·  British Union for Abolition of Vivisection

·  Farm Animal Welfare Council

·  Captive Animal Protection Society

·  Countryside Alliance

·  League Against Cruel Sports

 

Animal Learning and Training

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCALT5

Module Title

Animal Learning and Training

Module Leader

Donna Green

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Elective)

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

32 hrs

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

One

Scheduled teaching – 10 hours

Practical – 18 hours

Visits – 4 hours

 

Module Content

In this elective module students are introduced to a variety of learning and training techniques used with animals on a daily basis – techniques such as operant conditioning and clicker training. Students will be required to evaluate these different techniques, and apply some of their choosing in the training of different species.

Students will investigate learning theory (including operant conditioning, classical conditioning, habituation and sensitisation) and training methods (including clicker training, different reinforcement schedules such as continuous, fixed ratio and variable ratio), and will evaluate the importance of motivation, stimulus control and jackpots in the context of animal training.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate different learning theories in relation to animal training.
  2. Apply learning theories in the training of different species.
  3. Evaluate the use of different reinforcement schedules in the training of different species and the importance of motivation and stimulus control.

 


First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

2 x videos – 5 minutes each

(Learning Outcome 2)

Written report – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 3)

50%

 

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

2 x videos – 5 minutes each

(Learning Outcome 2)

Written report – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 3)

50%

 

50%

Key learning resources

Domjan, M., 2014. The principles of learning and behavior. 7th ed. London: Wadsworth.

Lindsay, S. R., 2000. Handbook of applied dog behaviour and training: volume 1 principles of behavioural adaptation and learning. Ames, IA: Iowa State Press.

Lindsay, S. R., 2001. Handbook of applied dog behaviour and training: volume 2 etiology and assessment of behaviour problems. Ames, IA: Iowa State Press.

Lindsay, S. R., 2005. Handbook of applied dog behaviour and training: volume 3 procedures and protocols. Oxford: Blackwell.

Reid, P., 1996. Excel-erated learning: explaining how dogs learn and how best to teach them. Harpenden: James and Kenneth.

Pryor, K., 2010. Reaching the animal mind: clicker training and what it teaches us about all animals. New York, NY: Scribner Book Company.

Journals:

·  Applied Animal Behaviour Science

 

Wildlife and Conservation

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWC5

Module Title

Wildlife Conservation

Module Leader

Jenny Watkins

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Elective)

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

50 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

Two

Scheduled teaching – 25 hours

Practical – 25 hours

Visits – This module will include onsite visits to conservation sites either abroad or within the United Kingdom.

Module Content

This fantastic module offers students the opportunity to implement a range of ecological field techniques acquired during their studies, during a 12-day onsite field visit to a wildlife reserve. As a result, students will gain a wealth of practical experience in the fields of land management and environmental assessment, compiling a field report as they go. Students will also be required to write a project about the work achieved throughout this module. Based on estimated costs of factors such as accommodation, board, travel, equipment, and other associated costs, the international wildlife reserve visit is expected to cost approximately £1,600, while the UK-based visit is expected to cost approximately £400, although these are subject to change. Attendance on one of these two options is mandatory for course completion, as assessments are based on field work conducted.

The module will provide training in a range of ecological census, monitoring and evaluation techniques, and in designing and collecting field data. Students will experience and learn about the ecology of a specific ecosystem while also gaining practical experience and further knowledge of applied ecological issues such as land management, environmental assessment and conservation of rare species. Through the field work component of this module, students will develop team work, communication, and presentation skills.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to use and analyse a range of ecological field techniques.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the ecology and management of a specific ecosystem.
  3. Evaluate conservation and management strategies of rare species.
  4. Plan, design and undertake an individual ecological field investigation.

 


First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

30-minute closed-book exam

(Learning Outcomes 3)

Field assessments – 2,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1, 2 and 4)

30%

 

70%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

30-minute closed-book exam

(Learning Outcomes 1-3)

Field assessments – 2,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1-4)

30%

 

70%

Key learning resources

Begon, M., Townsend, C. R. and Harper, J. L., 2006. Ecology: from individuals to ecosystems. 4th ed. Oxford: Blackwell.

Fowler, J, Cohen, L. and Jarvis, P., 1998. Practical statistics for field biology. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley.

Hambler, C. and Canney, S. M., 2013. Conservation. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Despard Estes, R., 2012. The behaviour guide to African mammals: including hoofed mammals, carnivores, primates. 2nd ed. Berkley, CA: University of California Press.

Goudie, A., 2013. The human impact on the natural environment: past present and future. 7th ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Gutteridge, L., 2011. The Bushveld: a South African field guide. 2nd ed. Pinetown: 30 Degrees South.

Stuart, C. and Stuart, T., 2015. Stuarts’ field guide to mammals of Southern Africa. 5th ed. Cape Town: Struik Publishers.

 

Behavioural Ecology

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCBE5

Module Title

Behavioural Ecology

Module Leader

Lesley Barcock

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Elective)

Module Level

Level 5

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

30 hrs

Work based learning

None

Semester

Two

Scheduled teaching – 30 hours

 

Module Content

This module will enable students to study the themes of natural selection and adaptation in behavioural ecology. There will also be a focus on how theories about evolution have changed over time. By the end of the module students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge on these topics through the combination of a written assignment and a poster.

The module will cover the role of natural selection in behavioural ecology, comparative approaches to the experimental study of behavioural ecology, and investigative studies of adaptation and their practical application. Students will examine the role of male and female availability in sexual selection, theories surrounding the evolution of elaborate ornaments, varieties of sexual conflict amongst animals and alternative breeding strategies. In order to understand the applications of sexual selection theory, students will learn about mating systems in a range of animals, theories surrounding constraints on parental care and caregiver choice, and variation in parental care and investment. Finally, students will investigate kin selection in a range of animals, the evolution of altruistic behaviour displayed by non-related animals, and methods of cooperation and helping in a range of animals.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Compare past and current theories of behavioural ecology and assess their practical application.
  2. Evaluate the theory of evolution of sexual selection and compare with alternative breeding strategies.
  3. Communicate the principles of different mating systems and methods of parental care in animals.
  4. Demonstrate a critical understanding and evaluate the theories concerning altruism and cooperation amongst animals.
  5. Explain the different cycles and rhythms and their significance.

 


First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 4)

A1 poster presentation

(Learning Outcomes 2 and 3)

50%

 

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written assignment – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 4)

A1 poster presentation

(Learning Outcomes 2 and 3)

50%

 

50%

Key learning resources

Davies, N., Krebs, J. and West, S. A., 2012.  An introduction to behavioural ecology. 4th ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Danchin, E., Giraldeau, L. and Cezilly, F., eds, 2008. Behavioural ecology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Krebs, J. R., 1997. Behavioural ecology: an evolutionary approach. 4th ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

McFarland, D., 1999. Animal behaviour: psychobiology, ethology and evolution. 3rd ed. Harlow: Longman.

Lendrem, D., 1986. Modelling in behavioural ecology: an introductory text. Beckenham: Croom Helm.

Westneat, D. F. and Fox, C. W., eds, 2010. Evolutionary behavioural ecology.  University Press.

Journals:

·  Behavioural Ecology

·  Animal Behaviour

·  BBC Wildlife

·  Nature

·  New Scientist

Websites:

www.users.ox.ac.uk/~kgroup  (Behavioural Ecology Research Group)

 

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