Top-up degree (validated by the Royal Agricultural University)

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What does the course cover?

This top-up programme will provide you with a systematic understanding of key aspects of animal behaviour and welfare, including acquisition of coherent and detailed knowledge.  Through different subject delivery you will be able to devise and sustain arguments and solve problems, using ideas and techniques at the forefront of the discipline. You will be able to apply the theory to practical scenarios giving youthe qualities and skills necessary for employment or academia.

You'll be encouraged to develop your analytical and critical skills; enabling you to assess animal welfare and to use assessment procedures of animal behaviour to evaluate animal wellbeing. Focusing on issues that relate to the animals, you'll study a wide variety of species and look at the impact on the animal behaviour, welfare and management industries. 

Entry Requirements:
  • Minimum age: 18
  • Foundation degree in Animal Science or Animal Management (FdSc) – mean grade of 55% or equivalent
  • Science-based qualification such as an HND or FdSc Veterinary Nursing - mean grade of 55% or equivalent
  • IELTS (for students with English as a second language): Level 6.5 overall with Level 6.0 in writing

Duration:

Full-time: 1 year

Part-time: 2 years

UCAS Details:

The UCAS code for this course is P315.

Costs:

For the academic year 2018/19 the tuition fees for this course are:

  • Full-time - £8,000
  • Part-time - £4,000

Facilities

Our Animal Management unit caters to all kinds of animals, enabling students to explore several areas of interest. Major recent developments within the unit include a new dog grooming unit, plus areas specialising in small mammals, birds of prey, cold and tropical aquatics, and our exotics with a wide range of amphibian, reptiles and snakes. Plumpton also has an 800-hectare farm that has a range of livestock including cows, horses, pigs and sheep.

The department also houses modern and fully-equipped laboratories which are an excellent location for animal science experiments and behaviour studies. Some of our equipment includes a digital binocular compound microscopes, HPLC and electrophoresis equipment, and a PCR Thermocycler. This enables students to learn and experience the practical elements of animal science in a safe and stimulating environment. 

Library

The library facilities at Plumpton is located in the heart of the college campus. There is plenty of space for quiet study and plugs at every desk. The library has extensive computer facilities to support student research and there is also easy access to printers. The library is staffed by the library manager and assistants.

There are over 10,000 books on land-based subjects, plus a range of magazines and journals, including electronic resources that may be accessed from College or home. The library stocks specialist material that covers a broad range of animal management, conservation and veterinary science subjects to facilitate students in their assignments and research projects. Students also have access to subject-specific e-journals and e-publications.

I.T. Resources

We have a dedicated Higher Education I.T. room here at Plumpton, providing reliable access to a quiet study space and printing facilities.

Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is based on the programme Moodle. It is used daily by both staff and students to ensure that we adhere to the College aim of using modern technology to help support outstanding teaching, learning and assessment at college. Staff are encouraged to empower their students through the use of digital tools both in and outside the classroom. For example, they can provide support before a lesson by uploading lecture slides onto the module page. Digital enhancement can be conducted in a variety of ways during a lesson, such as encouraging student interaction through the use of Virtual Reality. Meanwhile, post-lesson enrichment can come in the form of a lesson-review quiz. Students must also submit assignments online via Turnitin, allowing staff to provide accessible and detailed digital feedback.

HE Study Rooms

HE students have access to their own study rooms that is for the sole use of HE students. The rooms are located in the Research & Development building, and creates a quiet self-study environment for students. Additionally, there is also a dedicated HE common room designed to provide students with a space to relax and engage with other HE students.

Modules

Level 6 Modules

Research Project

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCRP6

Module Title

Research Project

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BSc (Hons) Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare Top-up (Core)

Module Level

6

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

Research Methods and Statistics (or equivalent)

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

5 hours group tutorial

1 hours individual supervision

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

1 & 2

 

 

Contact hours = 3 x 20 minute project supervision tutorials.

 

Module Content

The Research Project module enables the student to undertake, with guidance, an independent investigation of a topic relating to their field of study, and report on the findings. The module aims to allow the student to demonstrate independence of thought and originality in their work and to apply the research and enquiry skills developed during their studies.

In order to complete a research project, students will first select a topic relevant to their field of study, with guidance and approval from a supervisor. Students will then undertake a systematic literature review relevant to the area of study, plan and carry out the research in a timely, safe and ethical manner, complete a presentation of work in progress (formative), and present the research in the form of a written report (summative) which communicates the project aims, methods, results, and implications of the results in the context of the relevant field.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Plan, organise and execute the project investigation, using the most appropriate methods, with a minimum of external guidance.
  2. Draw conclusions from their research, reflect on the limitations, and explore routes for further investigation.
  3. Communicate their research in a formal report.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Written report (LO1-3) (6000 words)

 

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Written report (LO1-3) (6000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Bryman, A. and Bell, E., 2015. Business research methods. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Burgess, R., 1984. In the field: an introduction to field research. Abingdon: Routledge.

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Science.

Fisher, C., 2010. Researching and writing a dissertation: an essential guide business student. 3rd ed. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.

Silverman, D., 2015. Interpreting qualitative data. 5th ed. London: Sage.

Walliman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

 

Animal Cognition and Neuroscience

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCACN6

Module Title

Animal Cognition and Neuroscience

Module Leader

Jenny Watkins/ Donna Green

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BSc (Hons) Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare Top-Up (Core)

Module Level

Level 6

Module Credits

30 credits

Pre-Requisites

Animal Biology or equivalent

 

Minimum Study Time



300 hours

Contact Hours

 

70 hrs

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 70 hours

 

Module Content

This Level 6 module will see students engage in learning surrounding animal behaviour, and how the brain and other relevant sensory organs may influence it. This will be through the study of neurobiology, and neurobiological medications, as well as an introduction to Tinbergen’s four questions. The assessment for this module is divided 50:50 between exam and programme work.

Over the course of this module, students will demonstrate an understanding of the different neurological structures and their function, and the processes controlled by the vertebrate brain. Students will examine the effects of physiology on behaviour, including the role of different sensory organs, hormones and pheromones, circadian rhythms, and neurobiology (conscious and autonomic nervous systems) and neurobiological medications.

Cognitive aspects of behaviour will also be evaluated, including how signals are coded and evidence surrounding consciousness and different emotions exhibited by non-human animals. Students will learn about the functions of behaviour and behavioural processes based on Tinbergen’s four questions (including fixed action patterns for survival and reproduction, communication, territory, social bonding, imprinting), and will apply this knowledge to understand how behaviour can be used as a welfare tool (including normal and stereotypical behaviours, observing and quantifying behaviours) and be modified to meet the behavioural needs of animals (including identifying normal species-specific repertoires and analysing the factors to enable normal exhibiting of these behaviours).

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Examine the different structures and relate to function for a variety of animal brains and investigate and analyse the processes controlled by the vertebrate brain.
  2. Identify and evaluate the role and function of different sensory organs and examine the effect of physiology on behaviour.
  3. Review the processes involved in nerve transmission, explaining and interpreting the coding of signals.
  4. Evaluate the research surrounding consciousness and emotion in non-human animals.
  5. Examine the effect of neurobiology and neurobiological medications on behaviour.
  6. Interpret the functions of behaviour and expression of behavioural processes and evaluate the usefulness as a tool for welfare.

First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

A1 poster presentation at mini-conference

(Learning Outcomes 4, 5, and 6)

50%

Examination

Closed-book – 2 hours

(Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, and 5)

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

A1 poster presentation at mini-conference

(Learning Outcomes 4, 5, and 6)

50%

Examination

Closed-book – 2 hours

(Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, and 5)

50%

Key learning resources

Bear, M., Connors, B. W. and Paradiso, M. A., 2015. Neuroscience: exploring the brain. 4th ed. Philadelphia: Williams and Wilks.

Dawkins, M. S., 1995. Unravelling animal behaviour. 2nd ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Dawkins, M. S., 1998. Through our eyes only: the search for animal consciousness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kandell, E. R., Schwartz, J., Jessell, T., Siegelbaum, S. and Hudspeth, A. J., 2012. Principles of neural science. 5th ed. London: McGraw-Hill Education.

Kandell, E. R. and Jessel, T. M., 1995. Essentials of neuroscience and behaviour. New York, NY: Appleton and Lange.

Longstaff, A., 2011. Instant notes in neuroscience. 3rd ed. Abingdon: Garland Science.

Nicholls, J. G. Martin, A. R., Fucha, P. A., Brown, D. A., Diamond, M. E. and Weisblat, D., 2011. From neuron to brain. 5th ed. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.

Panksepp, J., 2004. Affective neuroscience: the foundations of human and animal emotion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Purves, D., Augustine, G. J., Fitzpatrick, D., Hall, W. C., LaMantia, A. S., Mooney, R. D., Platt, M. L. and White, L. E., 2018.  Neuroscience. International 5th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Shettleworth, S. J., 2010. Cognition, evolution and behavior, 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wynne, C. D. L. and Udell, M. A. R., 2013. Animal cognition: evolution, behavior and cognition. 2nd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Organisations:

Universities Federation for Animal Welfare – www.ufaw.org.uk

Journals:

·  Animal Welfare

·  Animal Cognition

·  Animal Behaviour

·  Applied Animal Behaviour Science

·  Journal of Ethology

·  Journal of Physiology and Behaviour

·  Science

·  Nature

·  Nature Neuroscience

·  Trends in Neurosciences

 

Animal Welfare and the Law

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCAWL6

Module Title

Animal Welfare and the Law

Module Leader

Donna Green

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BSc (Hons) Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare Top-Up (Core)

Module Level

Level 6

Module Credits

30 credits

Pre-Requisites

Welfare and Ethics or equivalent

 

Minimum Study Time



300 hours

Contact Hours

 

70 hrs

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 60 hours

Visits – 10 hours

Module Content

Animal Welfare and the Law will enable students to investigate a number of organisations relevant to welfare law across the UK, EU and USA. Organisations such as DEFRA and the RSPCA will be studied, as well as important animal legislations from history – the Animal Welfare Act of 2006, for example. Students will be required to assess this legislature and evaluate its impact on issues found within animal welfare.

In this module, students will investigate how welfare law differs in agriculture, scientific research and companion animals for the UK, EU and USA, and what influences animal law (including media representation, culture, scientific research and advances, being a member of the EU, zoonoses and human diseases, public lobbying). Students will evaluate the role of organisations and lobby groups (including DEFRA, FAWC, RSPCA, BUAV, HSA), media portrayal of animal-related issues, and society perceptions in terms of their effects on animal welfare, and will compare data and evidence from a variety of sources relating to animal welfare issues to evaluate the balance of these sources.

Several specific UK laws will be examined in detail, including the Animal Welfare Act 2006, Animals Scientific Procedures Act 1986, Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, Welfare of Farmed Animals (England) Regulations 2007, and Welfare of Animals at the Time of Killing (England) Regulations 2012. Students will evaluate both the efficacy and usefulness of the welfare indicators, measures, and standards used by and/or specified in these laws and the impact of the legislation on both humans and animals.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Analyse the factors underpinning comparable animal welfare law in different countries.
  2. Analyse the drivers influencing changes in animal welfare law.
  1. Analyse and evaluate the impact and effectiveness of a selection of UK animal welfare laws and legislation.
  2. Evaluate the impact of official organisations and lobby groups on the creation and development of legislation.
  3. Evaluate the role of media presentation relating to a current animal welfare issue.
  4. Analyse and evaluate the validity of arguments relating to a current animal welfare issue.

 

 

First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Presentation – 20 minutes

(Learning Outcomes 4, 5, and 6)

Written essay – 3,000 words

(Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, and 4)

50%

 

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Presentation – 20 minutes

(Learning Outcomes 4, 5, and 6)

Written essay – 3,000 words

(Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, and 4)

50%

 

50%

Key learning resources

Fancione, G. L. and Garner, R., 2010. The animal rights debate: abolition or regulation? New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Kelch, T.G., 2017. Globalization and animal law: comparative law, international law and international trade. 2nd ed. Alphen aan den Rijn: Wolters Kluwer.

McEldowney, J., Grant, W. and Medley, G., 2015. The regulation of animal health and welfare: law, science and society. Abingdon: Routledge.

Radford, M., 2001. Animal welfare law in Britain: regulation and responsibility. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Robertson, I. A., 2015. Animals, welfare and the law: fundamental principles for critical assessment. Abingdon: Routledge.

Journals:

·  Animal Welfare

·  Applied Animal Behaviour Science

Animal Organisations:

·  DEFRA

·  Universities Federation for Animal Welfare

·  RSPCA

·  BUAV

·  FAWC

·  Countryside Alliance

·  League Against Cruel Sports

·  NAVS

·  Animal Aid

 

Human-Animal Interactions

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCHAI6

Module Title

Human-Animal Interactions

Module Leader

Lesley Barcock

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BSc (Hons) Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare Top-Up (Elective)

Module Level

Level 6

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time



150 hours

Contact Hours

 

30 hrs

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

One

Scheduled teaching – 25 hours

Visits – 5 hours

Module Content

This module will explore the relationship between humans and animals in a variety of contexts, such as domestication, companionship and at work. Students will be expected to assess the positive and negative aspects of such relationships, as well as consider external factors, which could affect such a relationship. Upon completion of the module, students will be capable of analysing some of the aforementioned situations and make recommendations for human interactions with certain species.

In this module, students will identify the different relationships between humans and animals (including companion, working, and food) and evaluate the behavioural evolution of several animals through domestication.

Students will examine the value of animals in human societies, relating to food, companionship, status, work, medical research, and cultural and religious significance.

The negative and positive aspects of projection of human emotions onto animals in various contexts (such as companionship, communication with those with special learning needs, use of therapy animals) will be evaluated, as well as the human-related factors that conflict with conservation activity for specific species (i.e. competition for food, land and space, resources).

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify the relationship between humans and animals, and the behavioural evolution of species during domestication.
  2. Evaluate the factors underpinning the differing psychological values attributed to specific animal species.
  1. Analyse the impact on companion animals, which meet human emotional needs.
  2. Evaluate the conflict between meeting human and animal wildlife conservation needs.

First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written essay – 1, 500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

Written essay – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 3 and 4)

50%

 

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Written essay – 1, 500 words

(Learning Outcomes 1 and 2)

Written essay – 1,500 words

(Learning Outcomes 3 and 4)

50%

 

50%

Key learning resources

Bekoff, M., ed., 2007. Encyclopaedia of human-animal relationships: volumes 1-4. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood Press.

Budiansky, S., 1999. The covenant of the wild: why animals chose  domestication. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Hurn, S., 2012. Humans and other animals: cross-cultural perspectives on human-animal interactions. London: Pluto Press.

Jensen, P., ed., 2017. The ethology of domestic animals. 3rd ed. Wallingford: CABI.

Lovejoy, T. E. and Hannah. L. J., eds, 2005. Climate change and biodiversity.  New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Price, E. O., 2002. Animal domestication and behaviour. Wallingford: CABI.

Serpell, J., 1996. In the company of animals: a study of human-animal relationships. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Journals:

·  International Journal of Anthrozoology

·  University Federation of Animal Welfare

·  Journal of Zoology

·  Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition

·  New Scientist

·  Scientific American

·  Animal Behaviour

·  Journal of Evolutionary Biology

Companion Animal Behaviour Counselling

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCCAB6

Module Title

Companion Animal Behaviour Counselling

Module Leader

Donna Green

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BSc (Hons) Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare Top-Up (Elective)

Module Level

Level 6

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time



150 hours

Contact Hours

 

32 hrs

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

Two

Scheduled teaching – 20 hours

Practical – 8 hours

Visits – 4 hours

 

Module Content

This module will see students study the role of the behaviour counsellor, and some of the issues that they are tasked with solving. For example, students will be required to identify possible causes and symptoms of a variety of common behaviour problems, and will thus be tasked with recommending treatments for these problems. Students’ knowledge of these themes will be assessed through a combination of programme work assignments.

Students will identify the role of the behaviour counsellor and the importance of professional conduct, client history taking of a behaviour problem, assessment of behavioural patterns and problems, and accreditation and insurance. Students will apply their knowledge of learning theory, animal welfare, and human-animal interactions to identify possible causes and symptoms of a variety of common behaviour problems, appropriate strategies in modifying them, and possible medical causes of abnormal behaviours. Finally, the application of behaviour counselling will be evaluated using case studies of common problems and discussion of the variety of options available for appropriate management.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate the role of the animal counsellor and the skills and professional conduct required for the career.
  2. Apply suitable solutions to animal behaviour problems.
  1. Evaluate the application of behaviour counselling.

 

First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Case studies – 3,000 words

(Learning Outcomes 1-3)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Programme work

Case studies – 3,000 words

(Learning Outcomes 1-3)

100%

Key learning resources

Domjan, M., 2014. The principles of learning and behavior. 7th ed. London: Wadsworth.

Horwitz, D. and Mills, D., eds, 2010. BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Behavioural Medicine. 2nd ed. Gloucester: BSAVA.

Lindsay, S. R., 2000. Handbook of applied dog behaviour and training: volume 1 principles of behavioural adaptation and learning. Ames: Iowa State Press.

Lindsay, S. R., 2001. Handbook of applied dog behaviour and training: volume 2 etiology and assessment of behaviour problems. Ames: Iowa State Press.

Lindsay, S. R., 2005. Handbook of applied dog behaviour and training: volume 3 procedures and protocols. Oxford: Blackwell.

Reid, P., 1996. Excel-erated learning: explaining how dogs learn and how best to teach them. Harpenden: James and Kenneth.

Pryor, K., 2010. Reaching the animal mind: clicker training and what it teaches us about all animals. New York: Scribner Book Company.

Journals:

·  Applied Animal Behaviour Science

 

Contemporary Advances in Animal Behaviour

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCAAB6

Module Title

Contemporary Advances in Animal Behaviour

Module Leader

Donna Green

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College, Animal Management

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BSc (Hons) Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare Top-up (Elective)

Module Level

Level 6

Module Credits

15 credits

Pre-Requisites

None

 

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

32 hrs

Work based learning

0

Semester

One

Scheduled teaching- 32 hours

 

Module Content

The module will provide students with the opportunity to explore current issues and advances in animal behaviour, including reading of original research articles, critically evaluating the validity of evidence associated with current issues, and discussing and debating these topics.

This module will focus on small group discussion and debate of current issues and advances in Animal Behaviour and the evidence supporting these issues. The advances are constantly changing but may include topics such as canine cognition, measures of emotion, brain imaging, new training techniques, and welfare legislation changes.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

1.  Explore and appraise the evidence for current issues and advancements in animal behaviour.

2.  Evaluate the validity of the evidence and its importance to the future of animal behaviour research.

3.  Display detailed knowledge of a current advancement in animal behaviour through presentation in scientific conference or seminar.


First Sit

 

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

A1 Poster presentation

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

A1 Poster presentation

(Learning Outcomes 1-3)

100%

Key learning resources

Journals:

·  International Journal of Anthrozoology

·  University Federation of Animal Welfare

·  Journal of Zoology

·  Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition

·  New Scientist

·  Scientific American

·  Animal Behaviour

·  Journal of Evolutionary Biology

·  Animal Welfare

·  Animal Cognition

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