Bachelor's degree (validated by the Royal Agricultural University)

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If you are looking to gain a high-level career in the global wine trade, this unique, academically rigorous course will develop a strong framework for business management in this exciting industry. 

What does the course cover?

You’ll cover three core areas in the International Wine Business degree programme: general business management, the wine trade and wines of the world, with the focus being on the global nature of wine trading, distribution and sales. You’ll get to cover contemporary subjects, including new beverage development and launch, wine classification and global distribution channels. On the business side, you’ll study economics and data management, finance, marketing, operations and people management. In the wines of the world modules, you’ll have the chance to undertake in-depth research into the world’s key still, sparkling and fortified wine regions.

What about industry links? 

Being so close to London, one of the world’s key marketplaces for wine provides a great opportunity for keeping up to speed with the latest developments in the wine trade. You’ll get to benefit from presentations delivered by wine trade professionals, such as managers of wine tourism companies and sales directors from nationwide on-trade specialists. During your work placement, you’ll get to develop links with industry, plus our students are regularly asked to assist at trade tastings. You’ll have several opportunities to attend fantastic study trips to European wine-producing regions. Additionally, you’ll be able to take the WSET Diploma as an additional qualification, as a number of first and second year modules correspond to the Wine and Spirit Education Trust (WSET) Level 3 and Level 4 qualifications (please note that the cost of the WSET exams are additional to fees).   

Entry Requirements:

a. Minimum 18 years old on entry

b. 5 x GCSE (C/4) including English, Maths and Science

c. A pass grade or higher at the WSET Level 2 Award in Wines

d. Qualifications expected, usually in the form of:

  • 3 A-Levels at BBC grades
  • 104 UCAS points
  • or BTEC Level 3 Extended Diplomas at DMM
  • or International Baccalaureate Diploma at 26 points
  • or relevant industrial experience if over 21 years of age.

Students with English as a second language will be required to have gained IELTS level 6.0 overall with no less than level 5.5 in any component of the test.

Duration:

Full-time: 3 years

Part-time: 6 years

UCAS Details:

The UCAS code for this course is P510.

The Wine Business degree is exciting, challenging and unique as it offers a broad spectrum of modules where the element of theory and practice come together. The in-depth modules covering management, marketing and psychology have given me a breadth and depth of knowledge of the wine industry’s history, structure and scope.

The course takes wine knowledge to the next level as apart from the understanding of wine production, the frequent tastings of a broad range of wines from around the world have enhanced my ability to taste, evaluate and analyse wine. The expert lecturers in Plumpton College encourage and create positive learning environment and are always willing to help and assist. This environment have helped me to develop my critical thinking and analytical skills and prepared me to pursue my future goals.

My advice to international students, as I have been one, is just go for it. It’s a great experience and is the only institution in the UK that will give you the knowledge, contacts and solid foundations about wine and wine industry.

Stefanos Xinaris

BA (Hons) Wine Business

Facilities

You can be assured that in choosing Plumpton, you'll be studying in the heart of the South East of England's dynamic wine production industry and benefiting from our close proximity to the London wine trade. We manage 10 hectares of vineyards here - producing about 40,000 bottles of award-winning still and sparkling wine each year. 

At our Plumpton Wine Centre, you'll discover our outstanding purpose-built facility consisting of a commercial winery, laboratories, research winery plus a wine sensory evaluation room for you to use throughout your studies. 

Library

The library facilities at Plumpton located in the centre of the College campus. There is plenty of space for quiet study and plugs at every desk. The library has extensive computer facilities to support student research and there is also easy access to printers. The library is staffed by the library manager and library assistants.

There are over 10,000 books on land-based subjects, plus a range of magazines and journals, including electronic resources that may be accessed from College or home. The library stocks specialist material that covers a broad range of animal management, conservation and veterinary science subjects to facilitate students in their assignments and research projects. Students also have access to subject-specific e-journals and e-publications.

I.T. Resources

We have a dedicated Higher Education I.T. room here at Plumpton, providing reliable access to a quiet study space and printing facilities.

Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is based on the programme Moodle. It is used daily by both staff and students to ensure that we adhere to the College aim of using modern technology to help support outstanding teaching, learning and assessment at college. Staff are encouraged to empower their students through the use of digital tools both in and outside the classroom. For example, they can provide support before a lesson by uploading lecture slides onto the module page. Digital enhancement can be conducted in a variety of ways during a lesson, such as encouraging student interaction through the use of Virtual Reality. Meanwhile, post-lesson enrichment can come in the form of a lesson-review quiz. Students must also submit assignments online via Turnitin, allowing staff to provide accessible and detailed digital feedback.

HE Study Rooms

HE students have access to their own study rooms that is for the sole use of HE students. The rooms are located in the Research & Development building, and creates a quiet self-study environment for students. Additionally, there is also a dedicated HE common room designed to provide students with a space to relax and engage with other HE students.

Future Opportunities

With the UK seen as the most dynamic of world wine markets, our UK wine qualifications are held in high regard. You’ll have lots of opportunities to network directly in the wine industry; creating job opportunities for you after graduation. You can look at potential careers such as a business development manager, independent retailer, logistics officer or sommelier either in the UK or abroad. After graduation you can choose to continue your studies at higher levels, including with the Institute of Masters of Wine.   

 *Please note that this programme is subject to validation by the Royal Agricultural University for September 2019 entry.*

Modules

Level 4 Modules

Grape Growing and Winemaking

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCGGW4

Module Title

Grape Growing and Winemaking

Module Leader

Sarah Midgley

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

40 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 30 hours

Practical – 10 hours

Module Content

Grape Growing and Winemaking will enable students to establish a good grounding of knowledge regarding vinegrowing and wine production. Over the course of the year, students will learn about the wine production process from start to finish, from the vine to the bottling and packaging of the wine. Students will be expected to engage in the wine production process, to identify factors which could affect the quality of the product, and to demonstrate a good knowledge and understanding of the various methods at the winemaker’s disposal throughout the production process.

Grape Growing:

·  The vine plant: structure and growth cycle.

·  The influence of climate, soil and geographical features on grapevine. growth and wine quality.

·  Vine propagation, grapevine breeding, varietal and rootstock selection.

·  Vineyard operations, including site selection, vineyard establishment, soil and water management, winter pruning, canopy management, harvest.

·  Hazard, pest and disease management.

·  Sustainable vineyard practices, organic and biodynamic viticulture.

 

Winemaking:

·  The grape berry structure and ripening process.

·  Grape harvesting and processing.

·  Must treatments.

·  White and red wine fermentation processes, including yeast selection, phenolic extraction and the malolactic fermentation.

·  Post fermentation operations, including use of oak, clarification, stabilisation, maturation and blending.

·  Wine packaging: containers and closures, the bottling operation.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify and explain the climatic and site factors that influence the yield and quality of grapes produced in vineyards.
  2. Describe the processes involved in selecting, breeding and propagating vine varieties.
  3. Justify the need for vineyard operations, including the management of vineyard hazards, pests and diseases, and describe how these should be carried out.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the different options and processes in winemaking, and how they affect the style and quality of a wine.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

 

 

Examination

Series of Exams (LO1-4 (2 hours)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written Report (LO1-4) (3000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Bird, D., 2010. Understanding wine technology: the science of wine explained. 3rd ed. Newark: DBQA Publishing.

Clarke, O. and Rand, M., 2015. Grapes and wines: a comprehensive guide to varieties and flavours. London: Pavilion Books.

Rankine, B., 2004. Making good wine: a manual of winemaking practice for Australia and New Zealand. Revised and updated ed. Sydney: Pan Macmillan Australia.

Skelton, S., 2007. Viticulture: an introduction to commercial grape growing for wine production. London: SP Skelton.

Introduction to the Global Wine Industry

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCGW4

Module Title

Introduction to the Global Wine Industry

Module Leader

Lindsay Holas

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

40 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

2

Scheduled teaching – 36 hours

Visits – 4 hours

Module Content

Introduction to the Global Wine Industry examines the international wine sector, analysing the entire supply chain from vine to consumer. There will be a focus on comparing different business structures, major global organisations, stakeholders and global trends.

·  History of the international wine trade

·  The wine supply chain

·  The principal functions and roles carried out within global wine businesses

·  The key factors and current global wine trends

·  Wine purchase, payment and shipping options and the importation of wines and spirits.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Critically analyse the types of companies operating in the global wine trade and describe their impact on the dynamics of the world of wine business
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the factors affecting current trends in the global wine industry
  3. Evaluate different modes of purchase and payment for wine bought abroad and identify the rules, regulations and taxation regime concerning the importation of wine and other alcoholic beverages.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written report (LO1-3) (3000 words)

100%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written report (LO1-3) (3000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Colman, T., 2010. Wine politics: how governments, environmentalists, mobsters and critics influence the way we drink. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Hall, C. M. and Mitchell, R., 2007. Wine marketing: a practical guide. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Moulton, K. and Lapsley, J., 2001. Successful wine marketing. New York, NY: Springer.

Mora, P., 2016. Wine positioning: a handbook with 30 wine case studies of wine brands and wine regions in the world. London: Springer.

Posert, H. and Franson, P., 2004. Spinning the bottle: case histories, tactics and stories of wine public relations. San Francisco, CA: Wine Appreciation Guild.

Wagner, P., Olsen, J. and Thach, L., 2016. Wine marketing and sales: success strategies for a saturated market. 2nd ed. San Francisco, CA: Wine Appreciation Guild.

Periodicals:

Drinks Retailing News, Harpers, The Drinks Business, Meiningers. BevTrade Network, The Wine Economist

The Operation of a Wine Business

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCOWB4

Module Title

The Operation of a Wine Business

Module Leader

Lindsay Holas

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

80 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 80 hours

Module Content

The Operation of a Wine Business will see students investigate four key areas of business, contextualised against the backdrop of the wine industry. These key areas of study relate to the business of operations management and includes business finance, operations management, economics and people management. After completing the module students will be comfortable analysing a number of different market structures, as well as financial models that organisations use on a daily basis.

Business Finance

·  Forecasting, budgeting, cash flow, depreciation.

·  Profit and loss, balance sheets, intellectual property and risk management.

Operations management

·  Product planning, process design, managing materials.

·  Project management, quality control, scheduling and capacity.

Economics

·  Demand, supply and market equilibrium.

·  Scarcity, choice and opportunity cost.

·  Price elasticity, economies of scale and competitive behaviour.

·  Inflation, macroeconomic factors and economic policy.

People Management

·  Recruitment and selection.

·  Motivational theories and performance management.

·  Disciplinary procedures, redundancy and dismissal legislation.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

1.  Explain the importance of financial management within an organisation or business.

2.  Evaluate and apply underlying concepts and principles of operations management in an organisational context.

3.  Analyse the economic forces of price, supply and demand, explaining different types of market structure.

4.  Evaluate a range of staff recruitment and selection methods, and discuss a range of motivational theories and their relative effectiveness on employee performance.

First Sit

Assessment

Portfolio of assessment tasks

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO4) (1800 words)

30%

Examination

b.  Exam (LO3) (90 minutes)

30%

Practical

c.  Presentation (LO1-2) (15 minutes)

40%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO4) (1800 words)

c.  Written report (LO1-2) (2400 words)

30%

40%

Examination

b.  Exam (LO3) (90 minutes)

30%

Key learning resource

Armstrong, M., 2018. Armstrong's handbook of performance management: an evidence-based guide to delivering high performance. 6th ed. London: Kogan Page.

Brooks, I., Weatherston, J. and Wilkinson, 2011. The international business environment: challenges and changes. 2nd ed. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.

Cole, G., 2010. Personnel and human resource management. 5th ed. London: Continuum.

Ittelson, T. R., 2009. Financial statements: a step-by-step guide to understanding and creating financial reports. Revised and expanded ed. Pompton Plains, NJ: Career Press.

Mullins, L.J. and Christy, G., 2016. Management and organisational behaviour. 11th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Parkin, M., Powell, M. and Matthews, K., 2017. Economics. 10th European ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Rees, G. and French, R. eds., 2016. Leading, managing and developing people. 5th ed. London: CIPD.

Slack, N., Brandon-Jones, A. and Johnston, R., 2016. Operations management. 8th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Tennant, J., 2018. The Economist guide to financial management: understand and improve the bottom line. 3rd ed. London: Economist Books.

Study and Research Skills

AQSC Approval date: 14 August 2018 

Module Code

PCSR4

Module Title

Study and Research Skills

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

FdA Wine Business (Core)

FdSc Equine Science and Coaching (Core)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Core)

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time (Hours)

150

Contact Hours

45

 

Work based learning

None

Semester


Year

Scheduled teaching – 35 hours

Module Content

This module is designed to support students in the development of the study and research skills they will need to successfully complete their degree.

The module covers a number of key study skills including referencing, academic writing, presenting, and essential mathematical operations relevant to the student’s field of study.

The module also equips the student with an understanding of the concept of research and the reasons for undertaking research relevant to their area of study. The different stages of the research process are investigated and different types of research design discussed. Quantitative data analysis and inferential statistics are introduced.

Literature and communication:

  • Types of academic sources
  • Use of electronic search engines
  • Referencing
  • Communication skills; writing and presenting

Research methods:

  • Approaches to research
  • Developing a research question and hypothesis
  • Collecting data; design of experiments, sampling and survey design
  • Introduction into qualitative methods

Mathematical operations, data analysis and statistics:

  • A range of key mathematical operations relevant to students’ programme of study
  • Use of Microsoft Excel to record, manipulate and analyse data
  • Descriptive statistics; graphical summaries, measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • Introduction to inferential statistics; t-tests, chi-squared test

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify academic sources to support research and enquiry within their field of study and correctly reference.
  2. Design and document an appropriate method for collecting data to test a hypothesis / answer a research question.
  3. Perform mathematical operations and manipulations that are essential for their field of study.
  4. Analyse data, interpret the results and accurately communicate their findings.

 

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio of exercises (LO1-4)

100%

 

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Portfolio of exercises (LO1-4)

100%

Key learning resources

Anglia Ruskin University, 2017. Guide to the Harvard system of referencing. [online]. Available at:<https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm.> [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Braun, V. and Clarke, V., 2013. Successful qualitative research: a practical guide for beginners. London: Sage.

CETL-AURS, 2012. Engage in research. [online] Available at:< http://www.engageinresearch.ac.uk/>. [Accessed: 19th March 2018].

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Science.

Gustavii, B., 2017. How to write and illustrate a scientific paper. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rowntree, D., 2000. Statistics without tears: an introduction for non-mathematicians. London: Penguin Books.

Wine Marketing

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWM4

Module Title

Wine Marketing

Module Leader

Lindsay Holas

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

 
40 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

1

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

Module Content

Wine Marketing will see students analyse the wine business from two different perspectives: that of the buyer and that of the seller. Regarding the former, students will be exposed to information regarding buyer behaviour and the value chain, and how this may affect marketing activities. Meanwhile, students will also investigate the benefits of digital marketing and the various methods available for conducting market research, culminating in the construction of their own business marketing plan.

·  Market analysis tools

·  The marketing mix

·  Analysis of segmentation bases

·  Market research methods

·  Buyer behaviour, the value chain

·  Digital marketing

·  Ethical marketing

·  Constructing a marketing plan

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

1.  Analyse a wine product or service’s internal, external, macro and micro environment.

2.  Identify, explain and apply the key features of the marketing mix to a given wine product or service.

3.  Identify and evaluate the criteria for market segmentation, assessing how wine buyer behaviour affects marketing activities.

4.  Evaluate the suitability of different market research strategies.

5.  Evaluate the ethical considerations relevant to the marketing of a given wine product or service.

First Sit

Assessment

Portfolio consisting of:

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO1-4) (2000 words)

75%

Practical

b.  Individual presentation (LO5) (10 minutes)

25%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written report (LO1-5) (3000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Armstrong, G., Kotler, P. and Opresnik, M. O., 2015. Marketing: an introduction. 13th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Blythe, J. and Martin, J., 2016. Essentials of marketing. 6th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Brassington, F., 2006. Principles of marketing. 4th ed. Harlow: Prentice Hall.

Hall, C. M., and Mitchell, R., 2008. Wine marketing: a practical guide. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.

McDaniel. C. and Gates, R., 2015. Marketing research. 10th ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Wine Sensory Evaluation

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWSE4

Module Title

Wine Sensory Evaluation

Module Leader

Greg Dunn

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

FdSc Wine Production (Core) 

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core) 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

40 hours

 

Work based learning

None

Semester

2

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

 

Module Content

Wine Sensory Evaluation will see students exploring and assessing the major components found in commercial wines, whilst also being introduced to basic sensory science theory. In addition, this module will introduce the subject of wine faults, wine describing and wine scoring. By the end of the module students will be comfortable recognising common wine aromas and key wine components through tasting.

·  The basic anatomy and physiology of the sense organs in humans relevant to wine evaluation.

·  Basic sensory science theory, including sample preparation, measurement, analysis and interpretation of characteristics in wine.

·  Training exercises to teach the recognition and evaluation of the intensity of key wine components, such as paired comparison, duo-trio.

·  Sensory evaluation exercises in wine description, wine profiling and wine scoring.

·  Wine aroma profiling.

·  Wine faults, including oxidation, taints and instabilities.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Describe the principal mechanisms of sensory perception.
  2. Apply the underlying principles of wine sensory evaluation.
  3. Recognise and quantify key wine components through tasting.
  4. Recognise common wine aromas and basic wine faults.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Poster and peer presentation (LO1-2)

40%

Practical

b.  Series of practical tests (LO3-4) (75 minutes)

60%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report on sensory mechanisms (LO1-2) (1200 words)

b.  Written report on major components in wine (LO3-4) (1800 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Iland, P., Bruer, N., Ewart, A., Markides, A. and Sitters, J., 2012. Monitoring the winemaking process from grapes to wine: techniques and concepts. 2nd ed. Campbelltown: Patrick Iland Wine Promotions.

Kemp, S., Hollowood, T. and Hort, J. 2009. Sensory evaluation: a practical handbook. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Peynaud, E., 1987. The taste of wine. London: MacDonald & Co.

Rankine, B., 1990. Tasting and enjoying wine: a guide to wine evaluation for Australia and New Zealand. Adelaide: Winetitles.

Understanding Wine Styles

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCUWS4

Module Title

Understanding Wine Styles

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

FdSc Wine Production (Core) 

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core) 

Module Level

4

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

 
40 hours

Work based learning

 None

Semester

1

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

Module Content

This module will introduce students to the key wine producing regions of the world, to their individual characteristics and to their differences. By the end of the module students will be able to recall and identify the practices influencing the principal wines of the world.

·  The key wine producing regions of the world.

·  The effect of key factors influencing the style, quality and price of the wines produced, including location, soil, climate and viticultural and vinification practice.

·  The legal requirements for the labelling of still, sparkling and fortified wines for sale within the European Union.

·  The use of the WSET Level 3 systematic approach to tasting to produce tasting notes and assess the quality of wines.

The content of this module will cover the syllabus for the Wine and Spirits Education Trust (WSET) Level 3 Award in Wine and students will be invited to take the WSET Level 3 exam as an optional additional qualification.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Display a knowledge and understanding of the principal wines of the world.
  2. Identify the key factors influencing the production of the principal wines of the world and explain how these factors influence their style, quality and price.
  3. Describe accurately the organoleptic characteristics of the principal wines of the world.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

Tasting/theory exam (LO1-3) (2 hours)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written report (LO1-3) (3,000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Johnson, H. and Robinson, J., 2013. The world atlas of wine. 7th ed. London: Mitchell Beazley.

Stevenson, T., 2011. The Sotheby’s wine encyclopaedia. 5th ed. London: Dorling Kindersley.

WSET, 2016. Understanding wines: explaining style and quality. London: WSET.

Level 5 Modules

English Wine and Tourism

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCEWT5

Module Title

English Wine and Tourism

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Elective)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

BSc (Hons) Viticulture & Oenology (Elective)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

40

Work based learning

None

Semester

1

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

Module Content

This module has a distinct focus on the English wine industry. Students will examine the history, establishment and structure of the English wine production business. Also investigated will be key producers and recent developments in the industry, with students analysing the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the English wine industry. Tourism and the rise of oenotourism will also be studied comparing the UK with established successful wine tourism destinations, and students will be encouraged to think about how the English wine industry could imitate and improve upon other regions’ best practices.

English Wine Industry

·  History of the UK wine production industry

·  Wine production regulatory frameworks

·  Industry structure, business models and key producer analysis

·  Marketing and trade bodies

·  Markets for English wine

·  Trends and industry developments

·  Tastings of key varieties

Wine Tourism

·  Industry definition, historical context, size and structure of industry

·  Exemplar wine tourism destinations around the world

·  Factors affecting the success of wine tourism in a region

·  Wine tourism offerings and types of wine tourist

·  Ethical and environmental issues affecting wine tourism

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify, analyse and evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing the English wine industry.
  2. Identify, analyse and evaluate an international wine tourism destination.
  3. Recommend how the UK wine tourism industry can implement best practice from a successful international wine tourism destination.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO1) (1,500 words)

50%

Practical

b.  Presentation (LO2-3) (10 minutes)

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO1) (1500 words)

b.  Written report (LO2-3) (1500 words)

50%

50%

Key learning resources

Carlsen, J. and Charters, S., 2007. Global wine tourism: research, management and marketing. Wallingford: CABI Publishing.

Croce, E. and Perri, G., 2017. Food and wine tourism: integrating food, travel and terroir. 2nd ed. Wallingford: CABI Publishing.

Hall, C.M., Sharples, L., Cambourne, B., and Macionis, N. eds., 2000. Wine tourism around the world: development, management and markets. London: Routledge.

Harvey, D., 2008. Grape Britain: a tour of Britain's vineyards. Glasgow: Neil Wilson Publishing.

Selley, R., 2004. The winelands of Britain: past, present & prospective. London: Petravin.

Skelton, S., 2014. Wine growing in Great Britain: a complete guide to growing grapes for wine production in cool climates. London: SP Skelton.

Williamson, P., Moore, D. and Blech, N., 2008. A guide to the wines of England & Wales. London: BTL Publishing.

Periodicals:

The Journal of Wine Business Research.

Decanter, Harpers, Drinks Business.

The Grape Press.

SEVA News.

Research Methods and Statistics

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCRMS5

Module Title

Research Methods and Statistics

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdSc Wine Production (Elective)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

FdA Wine Business (Elective)

FdSc Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation (Elective)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Study and Research Skills

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

60

Work based learning


None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 60 hours:

·  Teaching to run through to Easter in Semester 2.

·  Input around research proposal elements (e.g. identifying a topic and experimental design) supported by sessions run within individual programmes.

 

Module Content

The Research Methods and Statistics module builds upon content covered in the Level 4 Study and Research Skills module.  This Level 5 module provides the student with the skills required to critically evaluate research, to statistically analyse and interpret quantitative data/analyse and interpret qualitative data.

The module has a strong applied and practical focus; the statistical methods are introduced through hands-on sessions using a statistical software package, and one of the assessments leads to the design of a Level 6 research project proposal.

The module will cover the following aspects:

·  The identification of appropriate sources of information to support research, including the critical evaluation of published work.

·  Communication of research to a variety of audiences and in different formats.

·  The identification of viable research problems and the selection of appropriate research strategies, taking into consideration the safety and ethical aspects of research.

·  The collection and analysis of data using a range of statistical methods, including parametric and non-parametric methods, and multivariate techniques.

 

Learning Outcomes 

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Identify a topic of investigation within your field of study and conduct a systematic literature review.
  2. Generate a written proposal for an independent investigation, incorporating an appropriate and robust research design.
  3. Select, justify and apply appropriate statistical techniques to support quantitative research or appropriate qualitative data analysis.
  4. Interpret the results of statistical analysis or qualitative data analysis, draw appropriate conclusions, and communicate the results effectively and accurately.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a. Research proposal (LO1-2) (1500 words)

b. Portfolio of statistical analysis, (LO3-4)

50%

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a. Research proposal (LO1-2) (1500 words)

b. Portfolio of statistical analysis (LO3-4)

50%

50%

Key learning resources

Bryman, A. and Bell, E. 2015. Business Research Methods.

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Fowler, J., Cohen, L. and Jarvis, P., 1998. Practical statistics for field biology. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Markman, R., Markman, P. T. and Waddell, M. L., 2001. 10 steps in writing the research paper. Hauppauge: New York.

McDonald, J. H., 2014. Handbook of biological statistics. [on-line] Available at: <http://www.biostathandbook.com> [Accessed 16th September 2016].

Petrie, A. and Watson, P., 2013. Statistics for veterinary and animal science. 3rd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Ridley, D., 2012. The literature review: a step-by-step guide for students.

2nd ed. London: Sage.

Ruxton, G. F. and Colegrove, N., 2016. Experiment design for the life sciences. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Silverman, D. 2010. Qualitative Research. London : Sage.

Walliman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Welham, S.J., Gezan, S.A., Clark, S.J. and Mead, A., 2014. Statistical methods in biology: Design and analysis of experiments and regression. Boca Raton: CRC Press.

Plus GenStat Teaching & Learning on-line help and guides, accessible from within the software and online.

Spirits, Sparkling and Fortified Wines

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCSSF5

Module Title

Spirits, Sparkling and Fortified Wines

Module Leader

Lindsay Holas

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Elective)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Understanding Wine Styles

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours
 

40

Work based learning

None

Semester

1

 Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

Module Content

This module enables students to explore the world of spirits, sparkling and fortified wines from start to finish. The module covers everything from the production factors of varieties of brandies, whiskies, ports, champagnes etc through to profiling key business and the trade legislature affecting them. Upon completion of the module, students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the factors and processes that each of these spirits, sparkling and fortified wines undergo.

Spirits of the world

·  Including brandies, whiskies, rums, vodka, tequila, gin, flavoured spirits, fruit spirits and liqueurs.

Sparkling wines of the world

·  Including Champagne, Crémant, Cava, Prosecco, Asti and New World sparkling wines.

Fortified wines of the world

·  Including Sherry, Port, Madeira, Vins Doux Naturels and New World fortified wines.

·  Production factors: regions, raw materials, production, maturation, blending and finishing, product variations, cost and pricing.

·  Trade and legal structures: legislation, duty, trade bodies, major business producers.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate the key factors affecting the production, style, quality and commercial value of spirits, sparkling and fortified wines of the world.
  2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the global trade, legal structures and markets for spirits, sparkling and fortified wines of the world.
  3. Describe, analyse and evaluate the organoleptic characteristics of the principal examples of spirits, sparkling and fortified wines of the world in accordance with the WSET systematic approach to tasting.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

Theory/tasting exam (LO1-3) (120 minutes)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

Theory/tasting exam (LO1-3) (120 minutes)

100%

Key learning resources

Broom, D. and Grant, D., 2006. Distilling knowledge: a professional guide to spirits and liqueurs. London: WSET.

Jeffs, J., 2016. Sherry. 6th ed. Oxford: Infinite Ideas.

Johnson, H. and Robinson, J., 2013. The world atlas of wine. 7th ed. London: Mitchell Beazley.

Mayson, R., 2016. Madeira: the islands and their wines. Oxford: Infinite Ideas.

Mayson, R., 2016. Port and the Douro. Oxford: Infinite Ideas.

Robinson, J. and Harding, J. eds., 2015. The Oxford companion to wine. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Stevenson, T., 2011. The Sotheby’s wine encyclopaedia. 5th ed. London: Dorling Kindersley.

Stevenson, T. and Avellan, E., 2013.  Christie's world encyclopaedia of champagne and sparkling wine. London: Absolute Press.

Diploma study packs for those taking Diploma units.

Periodicals:

Decanter, Harpers, Meiningers.

 

Strategic Management for Global Wine Business

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCSMG5

Module Title

Strategic Management for Global Wine Business

Module Leader

Lindsay Holas

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Operations Management for Wine Business

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

40

Work based learning

None

Semester

1

Scheduled teaching – 40 hours

Module Content

This module provides students with the knowledge and critical understanding necessary to apply principles of business and corporate strategy to marketing wine and other alcoholic beverages in the global wine trade.  Students will review case studies focussing on corporations based outside of the United Kingdom to develop a broader understanding of how key wine business operate in the current environment.

·  Tools for analysing the competitive landscape, internal and external environments.

·  International business strategies.

·  Designing and executing marketing strategies: advertising and promotion, events, trade and consumer PR, trade statistics, trade and consumer press.

·  Types of wine sales in the global market; retail, business to business, online.

·  Global market trends and movements

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the marketing and strategic functions within global wine businesses.
  2. Critically evaluate the resources and capabilities of a global wine business and provide strategic recommendations which leverage the firm’s core competencies.
  3. Critically analyse the relationships between stakeholders in a wine business environment.
  4. Analyse drinks industry news and suggest rationales behind actions made and decisions taken by the protagonists.
  5. Identify, target and evaluate International markets for selling specific wine products.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Series of written reports (LO1-5) (3000 words in total)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written report (LO1-5) (3000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Boddy, D., 2017. Management: an introduction. 7th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Flint, D. J., Signori, P. and Golicic, S. L., 2016. Contemporary wine marketing and supply chain management: a global perspective. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hall, C. M. and Mitchell R, 2007. Wine marketing: a practical guide. London: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Jobber, D. and Lancaster, G., 2015. Selling and sales management. 10th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Kourdi, J., 2015. Business strategy: a guide to effective decision-making. 3rd ed. London: Profile Books.

Mora, P., 2016. Wine positioning: a handbook with 30 wine case studies of wine brands and wine regions in the world. London: Springer.

Moulton, K. and Lapsley, J., 2001. Successful wine marketing. New York, NY: Springer.

Resnick, E., 2008. Wine brands: success strategies for new markets, new consumers and new trends. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M. and DeCenzo, D. A., 2016. Fundamentals of management: management myths debunked! 10th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Wagner, P., Olsen, J. and Thach, L., 2016. Wine marketing and sales: success strategies for a saturated market. 2nd ed. San Francisco, CA: Wine Appreciation Guild.

Periodicals:

Harpers, Drinks Business, Meiningers, Drinks Retailing News and

Purple Pages.

 

Wine Sales and Social Responsibility

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWSR5

Module Title

Wine Sales and Social Responsibility

Module Leader

Lindsay Holas

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

Introduction to the Wine Trade

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

40 hours

Work based learning

None 

Semester

2

Scheduled teaching – 34 hours

Guest speakers – 6 hours

Module Content

This module has a focus on the effects of alcohol on both the individual and society as a whole. Students will examine the themes of social responsibility in regards to alcohol, alongside various measures certain governments and business organisations take to promote responsible drinking. In addition, students will have the opportunity to organise a wine sales event where they will sources and sell the wines to members of the wine-buying public.

·  The effects of alcohol on the health of the human body

·  Alcoholism and responsible drinking

·  The impact of alcohol on society, including prohibition, political guidance and corporate social responsibility

·  Promotion and advertising of alcoholic products

·  Import regulations and shipping procedures

·  Wine labelling regulation

·  Costing, pricing and margin construction

·  Key wine sales techniques

·  Managing a sales activity

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Discuss the influence and role of alcohol consumption on UK society.
  2. Identify, analyse and evaluate current views on responsible drinking, including government advice and corporate responsibilities.
  3. Evaluate a wine sales event, including: investigating product options, sourcing wines and deploying key sales techniques.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

b.  Written report (LO3) (2000 words)

60%

Practical

a.  Presentation (LO1-2) (10 minutes)

40%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

Written report (LO1-4) (3000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Babor, T., 2010. Alcohol: no ordinary commodity: research and public policy. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Donnellan, C., 2001. Alcohol abuse: issues. Cambridge: Independence.

Grant, M. and O'Connor, J. eds., 2005. Corporate social responsibility and alcohol: the need and potential for partnership. Abingdon: Routledge.

Jobber, D. and Lancaster, G., 2015. Selling and sales management. 10th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Moulton, K., and Lapsley, J., 2001. Successful wine marketing, London: Springer.

Robinson, J., 1988. On the demon drink. London: Mitchell Beazley.

Robinson, S. and Kenyon, A., 2009. Ethics in the alcohol industry. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Wagner P., Olsen, J., and Thach, L., 2016. Wine marketing and sales: success strategies for a saturated market. 2nd ed. San Francisco: The Wine Appreciation Guild.

Wines of the World

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCWW5

Module Title

Wines of the World

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

FdA Wine Business (Core)

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

5

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

Understanding Wine Styles

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours
 

100 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester
 

Year

Scheduled teaching – 100 hours

Module Content

Wines of the World enables students to critically evaluate the production, style, quality and trading methods of some of the world’s principal wines. Still light wines from a number of regions will be analysed, including France, Spain, Italy, Australia, South Africa and Chile. Upon completion of this module, students will be able to describe the difference in production methods of various wines of the world and compare the trade and legal structures influencing wines of the world.

·  Still light wines of France; including Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Rhône Valley, Languedoc-Roussillon, Beaujolais, the Loire and Alsace.

·  Still light wines of Europe; including Italy, Spain, Germany, Portugal and Austria.

·  Still light wines from the rest of the world; including Australia, California, South Africa, Chile, Argentina and New Zealand.

·  Speciality wines of the world; including; rosé wines, orange and skin-ferment wines, low alcohol wines, dried grape wines, oxidised wines, organic, biodynamic and low-additive wines

·  Wine production factors: regional location, climate, soil, grape variety, vinegrowing, winemaking, maturation technique and cost.

·  Trade and legal structures: trade bodies, relevant legislation and pricing.

·  Principal organoleptic characteristics: appearance, nose, taste, degree of maturity, style and quality,

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate the key factors affecting the production, style, quality and commercial value of wines of the world.
  2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the trade, legal structures and global markets for wines of the world.
  3. Describe and analyse the organoleptic characteristics of the principal examples of wines of the world in accordance with the WSET systematic approach to tasting.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

a.  Theory/tasting exam on the wines of Europe (LO1-3) (120 minutes)

b.  Theory/tasting exam on the wines from the rest of the world (LO1-3) (120 minutes)

50%

 

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Examination

a.  Theory/tasting exam on the wines of Europe (LO1-3) (120 minutes)

b.  Theory/tasting exam on the wines from the rest of the world (LO1-3) (120 minutes)

50%

 

50%

Key learning resources

Jackson, R. S. ed., 2011. Speciality wines: advances in food and nutrition research volume 63. Oxford: Academic Press.

Johnson, H. and Robinson, J., 2013. The world atlas of wine. 7th ed. London: Mitchell Beazley.

Legeron, I., 2017. Natural wine: an introduction to organic and biodynamic wines made naturally. 2nd ed. London: CICO Books.

Robinson, J., 2015. The Oxford companion to wine. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Robinson, J., Harding, J. and Vouillamoz, J., 2012. Wine grapes: a complete guide to 1,368 vine varieties, including their origins and flavours. London: Allen Lane.

Stevenson, T., 2011. The Sotheby’s wine encyclopaedia. 5th ed. London: Dorling Kindersley.

WSET, 2016. Understanding wines: explaining wine style and quality. London: WSET.

Diploma study packs for those taking Diploma units.

Periodicals:

Decanter, Harpers, Meiningers

Work Placement

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCBAWP5

Module Title

Work Placement

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

Module Level

5

Module Credits

15

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

150 hours

Contact Hours

10

Work based learning

100 hours

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 10 hours, consisting:

-  Launch lectures

-  Group and individual support tutorials

 

Module Content

Students will take part in a work placement relevant to their field of study, comprising 100 hours of work-based learning. This will be an invaluable opportunity to learn more about their area of interest, whilst establishing industry contacts in a professional environment. Upon completion of the placement students will be required to compile a report, evaluating the knowledge and skills developed therein.

·  Selection and organisation of work placement or employer-led project, including meeting health and safety requirements, in a relevant sector.

·  Completion of work placement or employer-led project.

·  Development of both subject-specific skills and work-related skills such as numeracy, communication, interpersonal/teamwork, self-management and skills necessary for self-managed and lifelong learning.

·  Submit a report that evidences the learning outcomes.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Appraise, and justify the selection of, their workplace provider.
  2. Explain how the knowledge and skills gained in their studies have impacted upon their work placement.
  3. Critically evaluate the knowledge and skills developed whilst on work placement.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

3,000 word written report (LO1-LO3)

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

3, 000 word written report (LO1-LO3)

100%

Key learning resources

Fanthome, C., 2004. Work placements: a survival guide for students. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

McCabe, M., 2014. How to get an internship or work placement. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Herbert, I. and Rothwell, A., 2004. Managing your placement: a skills-based approach. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

Level 6 Modules

Wine Classification and Regional Analysis

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCCRA6

Module Title

Wine Classification and Regional Analysis

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

6

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

Wines of the World

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

80 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 80 hours

Module Content

Within Wine Classification and Regional Analysis students will explore the origins of wine classification, and how the current and past regulatory systems across the world affect wine production, the wine trade and the end consumer. In addition, students will be required to explore and critically evaluate two contrasting international wine regions.

Wine classification

·  The origins of wine classification

·  Classifications and the new consumer 1820-1900

·  Wine regulatory systems of Europe in the 20th Century

·  Current EU harmonised classifications

·  Current wine regulations outside the EU

·  Non-regulatory definitions and classifications

·  Impacts on the winemaker, traders and consumers

Detailed focus on two contrasting international wine regions, covering:

·  History and legislation

·  Climate, geography, viticulture and winemaking options

·  Range, quality, volume of production

·  Marketing and the role of trade bodies

·  Domestic and international distribution channels

·  Current issues, major trends and developments

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Critique the purpose and effectiveness of AOC and equivalent contemporary systems.
  2. Critically evaluate the currency, motives and purposes of international non-regulatory classifications and their protagonists.
  3. Identify a current issue affecting a wine region, investigate it through detailed research and make suitable recommendations to solve the problem.
  4. Analyse and critically evaluate the key international markets in which wines from a selected region are currently marketed and sold.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO3-4) (3000 words)

50%

Practical

b.  Presentation (LO1-2) (20 minutes)

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO3-4) (3000 words)

b.  Written report (LO1-2) (3000 words)

50%

50%

Key learning resources

Lukacs, P., 2012. Inventing wine: a new history of one of the world’s most ancient pleasures. London: W. W. Norton and Company.

Phillips, R., 2017. 9000 years of wine: a world history. Vancouver: Whitecap Books.

Robinson, J. and Harding, J., 2015. The Oxford companion to wine. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Robinson, J., 1992. Vines, grapes and wines: the wine drinker’s guide to grape varieties. London: Mitchell Beazley.

Stevenson, T., 2011. The Sotheby’s wine encyclopaedia. 5th ed. London: Dorling Kindersley.

Journal:

The Journal of Wine Business Research

Periodicals:

Decanter, Harpers, Drinks Business

Online resources:

OIV Resolutions

EUR-Lex

National industry bodies (e.g. Wines of Argentina)

Consumer Behaviour and Product Innovation

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCCBP6

Module Title

Consumer Behaviour and Product Innovation

Module Leader

Paul Harley

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

6

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

None

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

80

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 80 hours

Module Content

This module aims to provide the knowledge and understanding of consumer behaviour needed to enable students to undertake a meaningful analysis of the psychological factors underlying the wine-buying choices of consumers.  Students will also investigate the role that digital communications and social media play in the wine industry.  Finally, the module enables students to explore in detail the process of a new product launch, providing them with key skills for future ventures.

Consumer behaviour

·  The role of cognition and affection in the decision making process

·  Needs, wants and benefits

·  The role of the self in product consumption

·  Culture, attitudes and the role of product knowledge

·  Neuromarketing and retail psychology

Communications

·  Wine education and the principles of teaching and learning

·  Wine writing and journalism

·  Digital communication platforms

·  Information exchanges in business

·  The growth of social media platforms

·  Tools, technology and trends

New product development and launch

·  Market research and analysis tools, development and design

·  Concept design and packaging considerations

·  Production planning and sales forecasting including analysis of key stakeholders and internal barriers

·  Cost planning, promotional support, pricing

·  Launch and gatekeeper strategy toolkit

·  Study of legal and commercial constraints

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Provide a critical analysis of the determinants of wine consumer choice.
  2. Critically evaluate digital communication channels and make recommendations on how they can be used to communicate about wine and other alcoholic beverages in international markets.
  3. Originate an innovative business idea for the drinks industry and generate a new product development plan.
  4. Construct and justify a product launch and gatekeeper plan for a new drink concept.

 

First Sit

Assessment

Portfolio of tasks

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO1-2) (3000 words)

50%

Practical

b.  Presentation (LO3-4) (20 minutes)

50%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

Portfolio of tasks

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO1-2) (3000 words)

b.  Written report (LO3-4) (3000 words)

50%

50%

Key learning resources

Arnould, E. J. and Thompson, C. J., 2018. Consumer culture theory. London: SAGE.

Crawford, M.C. and di Benedetto, A., 2015. New products management. 11th international ed. Maidenhead: McGraw Hill.

East, R., Singh, J., Wright, M. and Vanhuele, M., 2017. Consumer behaviour: applications in marketing. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

Evans, M., Jamal, A. and Foxall, G., 2009. Consumer behaviour. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley.

Hall, C. M. and Mitchell, R., 2008. Wine marketing: a practical guide. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Paul Peter, J. and Olson, J., 2010. Consumer behaviour & marketing strategy. 9th ed. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill.

Resnick, E., 2008. Wine brands: success strategies for new markets, new consumers and new trends. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Solomon, M., Barmossy, G., Askegaard, S. and Hogg, M., 2016. Consumer behaviour: a European perspective. 6th ed. Harlow: Pearson.

Young, A., 2014. Brand media strategy: integrated communications planning in the digital era. 2nd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Periodicals:

Harpers, Drinks Business, Meiningers, Purple Pages

Journals:

European Journal of Marketing

International Journal of Wine Business Research

International Marketing Review

Journal of Consumer Marketing

Journal of Product & Brand Management

Journal of Wine Economics

 

Research Project

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCRP6

Module Title

Research Project

Module Leader

Andrew Atkinson

Division which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core)

BSc (Hons) Viticulture and Oenology (Core)

BSc (Hons) Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare Top-up (Core)

Module Level

6

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

Research Methods and Statistics (or equivalent)

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

5 hours group tutorial

1 hours individual supervision

Work based learning

None

Semester

 

1 & 2

 

 

Contact hours = 3 x 20 minute project supervision tutorials.

 

Module Content

The Research Project module enables the student to undertake, with guidance, an independent investigation of a topic relating to their field of study, and report on the findings. The module aims to allow the student to demonstrate independence of thought and originality in their work and to apply the research and enquiry skills developed during their studies.

In order to complete a research project, students will first select a topic relevant to their field of study, with guidance and approval from a supervisor. Students will then undertake a systematic literature review relevant to the area of study, plan and carry out the research in a timely, safe and ethical manner, complete a presentation of work in progress (formative), and present the research in the form of a written report (summative) which communicates the project aims, methods, results, and implications of the results in the context of the relevant field.

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Plan, organise and execute the project investigation, using the most appropriate methods, with a minimum of external guidance.
  2. Draw conclusions from their research, reflect on the limitations, and explore routes for further investigation.
  3. Communicate their research in a formal report.

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Written report (LO1-3) (6000 words)

 

100%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework A

Written report (LO1-3) (6000 words)

100%

Key learning resources

Bryman, A. and Bell, E., 2015. Business research methods. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Burgess, R., 1984. In the field: an introduction to field research. Abingdon: Routledge.

Dytham, C., 2010. Choosing and using statistics: a biologist’s guide. 3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Science.

Fisher, C., 2010. Researching and writing a dissertation: an essential guide business student. 3rd ed. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.

Silverman, D., 2015. Interpreting qualitative data. 5th ed. London: Sage.

Wallman, N., 2011. Your research project: designing and planning your work. 3rd ed. London: Sage.

The International Wine Trade

AQSC Approval date: 24 August 2018 

Module Code

PCIWT6

Module Title

The International Wine Trade

Module Leader

Lindsay Holas

Centre which owns module

Plumpton College

Programme(s) to which module belongs

BA (Hons) International Wine Business (Core) 

Module Level

6

Module Credits

30

Pre-Requisites

Wine Sales and Social Responsibility

Minimum Study Time

300 hours

Contact Hours

80 hours

Work based learning

None

Semester

Year

Scheduled teaching – 80 hours

Module Content

This module will see students developing a knowledge of the global distribution channels and markets for wine.  Following that students will investigate the role of wine aesthetics, subjectivity and objectivity in the wine industry and examine the importance of luxury markets and brand creation on the markets for fine wine.

International wine trade

·  Key national and international distribution channels including off-trade, on-trade, e-commerce and duty free, mail order, grey trading, emerging channels and direct sale

·  Big global players versus small producers

·  Matching styles of variously priced wine to distribution channels

·  Fraudulent trading

Fine wine

·  Fine wine market trends and industry developments

·  Wine investment and the ‘en primeur’ system

·  Hong Kong and other key international wine markets

·  Profiling key investment and luxury goods businesses

·  Luxury marketing for wine

Wine philosophy

·  Wine epistemology

·  The aesthetics of wine

·  Wine and its linguistic domains

·  Subjectivity and objectivity

 

Learning Outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Critically evaluate key distribution channels in the international wine trade.
  2. Critically analyse and evaluate a fine wine producer and assess the methods in which the wine is traded.
  3. Identify and justify suitable actions and processes related to luxury wine brand creation.
  4. Evaluate the role of fraudulent trading in the international wine trade.
  5. Debate the role and importance of subjectivity and objectivity in the international wine trade.

 

First Sit

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO1-4) (4500 words)

75%

Examination

b.  Exam (LO5) (60 minutes)

25%

Referral (capped at 40%)

Assessment

 

Weighting

Coursework

a.  Written report (LO1-4) (4500 words)

b.  Written report (LO5) (1500 words)

75%

25%

Key learning resources

Allhoff, F., ed., 2008. Wine and philosophy: a symposium on thinking and drinking. Oxford: Blackwell.

Brostrom, G.G., and Brostrom J., eds, 2009. The business of wine: an encyclopedia. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Itcaina, X., Roger, A., Smith, A., 2016. Varietals of capitalism: a political economy of the changing wine industry. New York, NY: Cornell University Press.

Kapferer, J.N., 2012. The luxury strategy: break the rules of marketing to build luxury brands. 2nd ed. London: Kogan Page.

Mora, P. ed., 2013. Wine business case studies: thirteen cases from the real world of wine business management. San Francisco, CA: The Wine Appreciation Guild.

Pellechia, T., 2006. Wine: the 8,000 year-old story of the wine trade. New York, NY: Thunder’s Mouth Press.

Robinson, J. and Harding, J., 2015. The Oxford companion to wine. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Smith, B. ed, 2015. Questions of taste: the philosophy of wine. Oxford: Signal. 

Smith, D., Mitry, D., Jenster, P. and Jenster, L., 2014. International business of wine. Chengdu: Nordic International Management Institute Press.

Sokolin, D. and Bruce, A., 2008. Investing in liquid assets: uncorking profits in today's global wine market. London: Simon & Schuster.

Journals:

European Journal of Marketing

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management

International Journal of Wine Business Research

Journal of Product & Brand Management

Publications:

World of Fine Wine Magazine

Harpers

Decanter

The Drinks Business

 

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